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B48371


Construction of Southlake Mall


Construction of Twin Towe rs

Northwes tern Indiana Regional Planning Commission

Comprehensive Annual Financial Report


Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2016


Construction of Lakes of the Four Seas ons


Trail Cree k Marina

Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission Council of Governments District


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Michiana Shores Long Beach

MICHIGAN

SPRINGFIELD GALENA HUDSON

Michigan

Pottawattomie Park


Whiting

East Chicago


NORTH

Lake Michigan


Ogden


Dune Acres

WESTCHESTER

Burns Porter

Town of

Beverly Pines Shores

PINE

City Trail Creek


COOL SPRING

County

LA PORTE

CENTER KANKAKEE


WILLS


Hammond


Munster


Gary


CALUMET


Lake Station

New

Dunes


Portage

Harbor

Chesterton


JACKSON


NEW DURHAM


SCIPICO

La Porte


PLEASANT


LINCOLN


Dyer

Highland

Griffith Schererville


ST. JOHN


Merrillville

Chicago

HOBART

Hobart


ROSS


PORTAGE


UNION

LIBERTY


Valparaiso


WASHINGTON


Westville


CLINTON


NOBLE


Kingsbury

WASHINGTON


Kingsford Heights

UNION


JOHNSON

St. John

CENTER

Wanatah


HANOVER


Crown

Point Winfield


PORTER

PORTER


CASS


HANNA


Cedar Lake


CENTER


LAKE


WINFIELD


Hebron

County

MORGAN


Kouts


PRAIRE


Lowell

County EAGLE

CREEK


BOONE


PLEASANT


La Crosse

DEWEY


WEST CREEK


CEDAR CREEK


Schneider


Wis con s in


Michigan



Illino is

INDIANA


Ohio


Ken tuc ky

COMPREHENSIVE ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT


NORTHWESTERN INDIANA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION


image

image R P C


For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2016


Prepared by the Office of Finance and Administration Angie Hayes, Director


On the Front Cover:

Construction of Southlake Mall, Hobart, Indiana. Provided by NIRPC Photo Collection Construction of Twin Towers, Merrillville, Indiana. Provided by NIRPC Photo Collection Construction of Lakes of the Four Seasons. Provided by NIRPC Photo Collection

Trail Creek Marina, Michigan City, Indiana. Provided by NIRPC Photo Collection


On the Back Cover:

Southlake Mall, Hobart, Indiana. Photo by: Google

Twin Towers, Merrillville, Indiana. Photo by: Stephen Sostaric Lakes of the Four Seasons. Photo by: Google

Trail Creek Marina, Michigan City, Indiana. Photo by: Google

NORTHWESTERN INDIANA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION

Comprehensive Annual Financial Report For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2016


TABLE OF CONTENTS


INTRODUCTORY SECTION Page

Letter of Transmittal 1

GFOA Certificate of Achievement 9

2016 Commission Board From Lake County 10

2016 Commission Board From Porter County 11

2016 Commission Board From LaPorte County 12

Commission Organizational Chart 13

Commission Staff Organizational Chart 14

FINANCIAL SECTION

Independent Auditor’s Report 17

Management’s Discussion and Analysis 21

Basic Financial Statements:

Government-Wide Financial Statements:

Statement of Net Position 31

Statement of Activities 32

Fund Financial Statements:

Balance Sheet – Governmental Funds 35

Statement of Revenues, Expenditures, and Changes in Fund

Balances – Governmental Funds 36

Notes to the Financial Statements 37

Required Supplementary Information: Budgetary Comparison Schedules:

General Fund 51

LaPorte RLF 52

Transit Operating 53

Notes to Required Supplementary Information 54

Supplementary Information:

Budgetary Comparison Schedule – Transit Capital 59

STATISTICAL SECTION

Table of Contents Statistical Section Financial Trends:

Net Position by Component 65

Changes in Net Position 66

Fund Balances of Governmental Funds 67

Changes in Fund Balances of Governmental Funds 68

Demographic and Economic Information:

Demographic and Economic Statistics 71

Employment by Industry 72

Operating Information:

Full-time Equivalent Employees by Function 74

Capital Asset Statistics by Function 75

COMPLIANCE SECTION

Independent Auditor’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting and on Compliance and Other Matters Based on an Audit of Financial Statements

Performed in Accordance with Government Auditing Standards 79

Independent Auditor's Report on Compliance for Each Major Federal Program; Report on Internal Control Over Compliance; and Report on Schedule of Expenditures of Federal Awards Required by the Uniform Guidance 81

Schedule of Expenditures of Federal Awards 83

Notes to Schedule of Expenditures of Federal Awards 84

Schedule of Findings and Questioned Costs 85


This Page is Intentionally Blank

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Introductory


This Page is Intentionally Blank

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May 30, 2017


Honorable Members

Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission Dear Commissioners:

Formal Transmittal


We are pleased to submit the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) of the Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission (Commission) for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016.


This financial report has been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America (GAAP) by the Commission’s management and staff that are responsible for and affirm the adequacy of the material presented in this report based upon a comprehensive framework of internal control that has been established for this purpose. Since the cost of internal control should not exceed anticipated benefits, the objective is to provide reasonable, rather than absolute, assurance that the financial statements are free of any material misstatements. We believe the Commission’s internal controls adequately safeguard assets and provide reasonable assurance of the proper recording of financial transactions.


To the best of our knowledge and belief, the information as presented herein is accurate in all material respects. The information is presented in a manner designed to set forth fairly the financial position and results of operations of the Commission as measured by the financial activity of the various funds. All disclosures necessary to enable the reader to gain the maximum understanding of the Commission’s financial affairs have been included.


The Commission’s financial statements have been audited by the Indiana State Board of Accounts as established by Indiana General Assembly to review and perform the external audit of units of governments in Indiana. The goal of the independent audit is to provide reasonable assurance that the financial statements presented here for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016, are free of material misstatement. In addition, the Commission is required to undergo a Single Audit of Federal programs conducted under the provisions of OMB Circulars A-133 and 2 CFR Part 200. The Commission has been issued an unqualified opinion. The independent auditor’s report is located at the front of the financial section of this report.


GAAP also requires that management provide a narrative introduction, overview and analysis to accompany the basic financial statements. The efforts to establish this narrative are presented in the form of Management’s Discussion and Analysis (MD&A) which can be found immediately following the independent auditor’s report.


Profile of the Government


The Commission is nestled in the northwest corner of Indiana between the metropolitan influences of Chicago and Indianapolis. Northwest Indiana, shaped by sand and steel, draws on a rich history of economic accomplishment and unmatched natural beauty.

The Commission was originally called the Lake-Porter County Regional Transportation and Planning Commission and was created by state statute in 1965 defined as a multi-purpose, area-wide planning agency. A 1973 amendment provided the Commission with its current name and gave LaPorte County the option to join the Commission. In 1975, Indiana Governor Otis T. Bowen re-designated the Commission as the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) for the two-county region. Then in 1979 LaPorte County exercised their option to join which made the Commission a three county agency.


In 2003, significant and major changes were made to the Commission’s functions and appointing authorities in a law passed by the Indiana General Assembly and signed by the Governor. The new state enabling legislation defined the Commission as a Council of Governments (COG) and designated regional planning responsibilities in the areas of economic development, environmental resources, and transportation. Reorganizing the Commission as a council of governments increased the size of the membership from thirty-nine (39) to fifty-one (51) at that time. The new seats included representation from all forty-one (41) cities and towns from within the three-county region, the county surveyor from each county, one county council member and county commissioner from each member county, and one member appointed by the Governor. The legislation also specified that only elected officials could be appointed to serve on the Commission. In 2007, the legislation was amended to add trustees of a township with a population over 8,000 which do not contain a municipality. This amendment added two more voting members, making the total Commissioner Board fifty-three (53) in number. The Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) and a public transit operator representative selected by the operators have the opportunity to participate in vital roles on the Commission Board as non-voting members.


The Commission is responsible for its annual budget. The budget for governmental funds is adopted on a basis consistent with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. These funds include the Commission’s general fund, its special revenue funds, and its one capital projects fund. A proposed budget for the ensuing year is submitted to the Commission by the Executive Director. This usually occurs at the fourth quarterly meeting of the Commission which is typically held in October. The Commission may vote to adopt the budget at this meeting, or may call a special meeting to take action on the budget.


The budget as adopted by the Commission is organized by object class categories. Major object class categories represent the legal level of control. Amendments to the adopted budget may be made only by the Commission at any regular meeting of the Commission or at any special meeting of the Commission called to consider the budget. The Commission has established a Finance and Personnel Committee composed exclusively of Commission members appointed by the Chair. This Committee exercises financial oversight over Commission operations and establishes more detailed accounts. Amounts presented in the financial statements are the final budget amounts for the year, as legally amended.


The Commission’s planning area is comprised of the participating counties of Lake, Porter and LaPorte in Indiana. This area has a population of 771,815 as of the 2010 Census, covers 1520 square miles in area, and includes forty-one municipalities and forty-four townships. The Commission has received numerous designations from state and federal agencies for programs which encourage or require area-wide planning in such fields as economic development, transportation, environmental protection and comprehensive planning.


Metropolitan Planning Organization Functions


The Commission also functions as the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) for northwest Indiana. Planning is carried out in accordance with the federal transportation planning requirements of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (FAST Act), the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and their predecessor acts. The major products of the metropolitan area transportation planning process are a Unified Planning Work Program, a long range plan and a short range plan program of projects. The Commission works with federal and state transportation departments, local municipalities and local transit operators to prioritize and fund regional projects, making the region well- positioned to capitalize on some the most strategic and critical links in our nation’s transportation system. This is accomplished through the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP), a short-term (four-year) list

of federally funded surface transportation investment projects. Surface transportation projects include those for public transit, local and state highways and bicycle/pedestrian projects. The Commission adopts a new TIP every other year. In between those years, revisions are made to the TIP by way of amendments which are presented to the Technical Planning Committee for approval and ultimately acted upon by the Commission. Projects in the TIP have to support the implementation of the long range transportation element of the comprehensive plan.


The first three-county comprehensive regional plan was adopted by the Commission in June 2011 after an intensive 30-month planning process. The process included an extensive and unprecedented public participation effort beginning with a regional forum in December, 2008 that attracted over 500 participants from the three-county area. It was the most demographically balanced function of its kind ever held in the three-county region. The forum was followed by over 30 workshops and meetings in 2009 and 2010 which produced the Plan’s vision statement, goals and objectives; regional public policy recommendations; and implementation strategies.


The 2040 Comprehensive Regional Plan placed the Commission in a new role in the region with respect to planning and implementation. The Commission is called upon to assist local governments and regional stakeholders to develop integrated land use and transportation strategies, support economic development efforts, help realize land conservation and a protected green infrastructure, and to do so in a manner that recognizes and supports social equity and environmental justice. The breadth of the 2040 Plan planning initiatives suggests a broader role for the Commission in realizing the future aspirations of northwest Indiana. The 2040 Plan lays the foundation and establishes the program for how the Commission will assist northwest Indiana in realizing its vision.


The 2040 Plan took the top honor in receiving the prestigious 2013 Daniel Burnham Award for a Comprehensive Plan from the American Planning Association (APA). The Daniel Burnham Award recognizes a comprehensive plan that advances the science and art of planning. The award is named for America’s most famous planner, Daniel Burnham, for his contributions to the planning profession and to a greater awareness of the benefits of good planning. This award is an exceptional national honor, representing the best in category among nationwide submittals.


This recognition is accompanied by the National Association of Regional Councils’ 2010 and 2012 Outstanding Achievement Awards for the planning process and for the plan respectively; the 2009 Indiana Metropolitan Planning Organization award for Outstanding Public Involvement; and the Indiana Chapter of the APA’s awards - in 2010 for Outstanding Community Initiative, in 2012 for Outstanding Plan, and in 2014 for Outstanding Best Practice for the Plan’s implementation strategy.


In late 2014, the Commission began the process of preparing an update to the 2040 Plan called the 2040 Comprehensive Regional Plan Update Companion. The Commission conducted a series of focused listening sessions throughout the region in the fall of 2014. These sessions included several areas of interest, primarily including public transportation, the environment and freight. The Update Companion was adopted by the Commission in May, 2015. This document provides a snapshot of major planning initiatives undertaken, and changes in regional demographics since the release of the 2040 Plan in 2011. The Update Companion did not represent a significant overhaul of the planning processes that led to the creation of the 2040 Plan. The goals, objectives and implementation strategies from the Plan remain consistent with the regional vision, and thus no additional work was necessary to revise these. The Update Companion recognized a few new projects that will be included in an updated TIP, including having been analyzed for air quality conformity with clean air standards. Every four years, the MPO planning process undergoes a planning certification review by the Federal Highway Administration and the Federal Transit Administration to assure compliance with federal metropolitan area transportation planning regulations. The Commission’s next review is scheduled for July, 2017.


In 2014, the Commission launched its “Creating Livable Centers” program, implementing key goals of the 2040 Plan to enhance the vitality and viability of the region’s communities. The innovative nature of this program was recognized with a 2014 award from the Indiana Chapter of the American Planning Association.

Approved in 2015 and implemented in 2016, the Commission updated its committee structure. Since the Commission is both an MPO and a COG, the new committee structure is defined according to the requirements of these roles. Three committees provide assistance to the Commission under overall function of the COG: the Legislative Committee, the Finance & Personnel Committee and the Local Government Advisory Committee. Under the MPO role, projects will originate in the Transportation Resource & Oversight Committee and then flow to the six topical committees: Environmental Management Policy Committee; Ped, Pedal & Paddle Committee; Land Use Committee; Rail Vision/Freight; Transit Operators Roundtable and the Surface Transportation Committee for recommendation to the Technical Planning Committee (reformulated from the Transportation Policy Committee and Pathway to 2040 Implementation Committee) for final recommendation to the Commission for adoption. The Outreach Committee is born of the Public Participation Plan and works alongside the process of the MPO committees to ensure accountability and transparency.

Inherent within this new structure, the Commission has created an implementation and monitoring process to ensure goals of the 2040 Plan are inculcated throughout NIRPC’s activities and processes. NIRPC’s committees include a range of stakeholders who are able to contribute within NIRPC’s primary topical areas. This is an innovative structure for a regional planning agency and helps ensure the Commission’s decision-making process more transparent and accessible.

The Commission provides several support services to governmental bodies within northwest Indiana. These services are provided through the combined efforts and utilization of financial resources obtained directly through the appropriations made by participating counties.


Provided Services


Federal Transit Administration


Since 1975, the Commission has acted as the designated direct recipient for Federal Transit Administration (FTA) funding. The Urban Mass Transportation Administration of the U.S. Department of Transportation (UMTA), the forerunner of FTA, made federal funds available to human service providers who were acting as the public transportation providers in areas where no government-supported public transit existed. Since there were many small agencies applying for small grants, UMTA/FTA approached the Commission to become the direct recipient on behalf of these small operators.


As required by FTA, the Commission provides oversight and technical assistance for seven subrecipients: City of East Chicago, City of LaPorte, City of Valparaiso, North Township Dial-a-Ride, Opportunity Enterprises, Porter County Aging and Community Services, and South Lake County Community Services. These subrecipients operate various services such as fixed route with complementary paratransit and demand response service within portions of northwest Indiana, as well as commuter service to Chicago.


The Commission has a dual-role purpose in the FTA grant process. The first role is that of the MPO that requires the Commission to include all grant monies necessary for transit operations, including equipment, to be included in the TIP. This process is done through an operators’ round table meeting, from which the results are then included in the TIP and taken to the Technical Planning Committee for recommendation and subsequently submitted to the Commission for approval.


The second role is that of grant management. The Commission is responsible for meeting grant responsibilities and reporting requirements as mandated by FTA. In administering FTA funded projects, the Commission must monitor grant-supported activities to ensure compliance with applicable Federal requirements. This includes the administration and management of the grant in compliance with the Federal regulations, Grant Agreement, and applicable FTA circulars. The Commission is also responsible for funds that “pass through” to the subrecipients.


Every three years, FTA performs a triennial review to examine the Commission’s performance and adherence to current FTA requirements and policies. The review process currently examines 17 areas of compliance. In addition to helping evaluate the Commission, the review gives FTA an opportunity to provide technical assistance on the latest FTA requirements and aids FTA in reporting to the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Transportation, Congress, other oversight agencies, and the transit community. The most recent triennial review of the Commission was conducted by FTA in September, 2014. The next triennial for the Commission is scheduled for June, 2017.


Revolving Loan Fund Program


Another service the Commission provides is administration of the LaPorte Revolving Loan Fund. The revolving loan fund program is one of several tools of the U.S. Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration (EDA) available to assist areas with high unemployment. A revolving loan fund is a pool of money used by an eligible recipient for the purpose of making loans to achieve certain economic benefits. As the loans are repaid by borrowers, the money is returned to the fund to make new loans. In that manner, the fund becomes an ongoing or revolving financial tool. Due to the high unemployment rate in the region in the mid-1980s, LaPorte County was awarded the federal revolving loan grant to help stimulate job retention and creation. The Commission was chosen to administer the revolving loan fund given its neutrality in the Region and its capacity to run the program. In 1987, the Commission established the LaPorte Revolving Loan fund to account for the financial resources used for the revolving loan fund program in LaPorte County.


In 2015, the loan committee updated the management plan which the Commission adopted by Resolution No. 16-19 in 2016. The Commission funded two new loans in 2015, the first since 2010. With approval from EDA, the Commission funded a third loan in 2016 and a fourth in 2017.


Other Programs


The Commission provides staff services on a continuing basis, via contractual relationships, to several governmental organizations serving northwestern Indiana. These include the Kankakee River Basin Commission and the Lake Michigan Marina and Shoreline Development Commission. Each of these organizations is an independent governmental unit. In addition to providing services to these agencies, the Commission also provides services on a contractual basis to other governmental units (such as cities and towns) within the region. Most of these other arrangements are for the undertaking of specific projects or programs, such as the preparation of a plan or study of some aspect of the community’s development.


Other services are provided utilizing revenues received through specific federal and state grants, contracts or agreements. These services usually involve the provision of specific types of services, often in the form of studies or demonstration projects, which benefit local governments in the region. Often these programs require a matching share of resources from the Commission. This matching share is usually derived from the county appropriations. Still other types of services are provided for through contractual or other arrangements with specific local governmental bodies.


Information Useful in Assessing the Commission’s Economic Condition


Northwest Indiana is noted for its heavy industry. Gary, Portage, Burns Harbor and East Chicago are home to major steel mills, including the largest North American facilities for both U.S. Steel (Gary Works) and ArcelorMittal (Indiana Harbor). Whiting and Hammond are home to the largest oil refinery in the Midwestern U.S., operated by BP. Other industrial outputs include fabricated metals, transportation equipment, and food products.

The steel industry is still the Region’s biggest economic producer, while health care and social services are the Region’s largest industry employer. Although the steel industry has seen dramatic improvement in productivity resulting in less jobs, those jobs still pay higher wages than those in other industries. According to the 2010 IMPLAN economic model, one steelworker job creates approximately four other jobs as those steelworkers and their families spend their earnings. According to IN Business, March 2016 edition, the Region has seen a decline in steel production, which calls for business leaders to take bold steps to diverse for future economic growth. The article suggests creating infrastructure such as public transit that would better connect northwest Indiana to the high-paying jobs in Chicago.


Indiana University Northwest School of Business and Economics department, led by Dr. Micah Pollak and Dr. Bala Arshanapalli, has published the Coincident Index. The index measures economic activity for northwest Indiana and provides a six month economic forecast. The index created by Indiana University Northwest is modeled after the State and National coincident indices published by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. The index variables used to determine the index value are nonfarm payroll employment, average hours worked in manufacturing, the unemployment rate, and wage and salary disbursements deflated by the consumer price index. As indicated in the Coincident Index below the region has seen significant progress in recovering from the 2008 recession. The most current Coincident Index report is expecting moderate growth at a rate of 1% for the next six month period. The index can be found on the school’s website (http://iun.edu/business/nwi/index.htm).


C:\Users\Angie\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\Content.IE5\NKYXV9SS\chart (1).jpeg

Source: Indiana University Northwest (http://iun.edu/business/nwi/coincident.htm)


Indiana University Northwest School of Business and Economics department has also published the Northwest Indiana Imputed Gross metropolitan product (GMP). The GMP is a measure of the value of all final goods and services produced within a metropolitan area during a year. GMP is similar to Gross

Domestic Product (GDP), which measures economic output and activity at the national level. In the fourth quarter of 2016, the annual estimate of Northwest Indiana's Gross Metropolitan Product (GMP) was equal to $29.59 billion. This places the relative size of Northwest Indiana's Economy at 8.6% of the State of Indiana's economy and 4.6% of the economy of the Chicago Metropolitan Area. GMP per capita was equal to $41,683/person. When adjusting for inflation, real GMP for Northwest Indiana fell by 0.5% and real GMP per capita fell by $614 per person (-1.5%) compared to one year ago.


Snapshot of 2016 Northwest Indiana Nominal Gross Metropolitan Product

Level 12-month growth

Nominal GMP $29.44 billion

$450 million

(+1.55%)

GMP per capita $41,683/person

$233 (+0.56%)


Source: Indiana University Northwest (http://iun.edu/business/nwi/GMP.htm)


Formation of the EDD


To assist the three county region of Lake, Porter, and LaPorte in developing and implementing economic development programs, the Commission and the Northwest Indiana Forum (Forum) came together to create the Northwest Indiana Economic Development District (NWIEDD) as a Not-For-Profit Corporation in 2009. In 2014, the NWIEDD changed bylaws to become an autonomous self-appointing board. In December of 2015 the NWIEDD submitted its request for designation of district status that meets the Economic Development Administration (EDA) requirements noted in 13 CFR part 304 to the Economic Development Administration. District status would make the NWIEDD as well as applicants within the three county jurisdiction eligible to receive grant funds in order to implement the Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) projects. Currently the NWIEDD maintains and implements the CEDS plan. The CEDS represents the confluence of local public and private interests and is intended to be a roadmap to a bright future in northwest Indiana. The deliberation and forethought incorporated in the CEDS is designed to help create jobs, foster a more stable and diversified economy, and improve quality of life. It provides a mechanism to coordinate the efforts of individuals, organizations, local governments, and private industry concerned with economic development.


The Commission


The Commission is funded primarily by federal grant dollars either directly or passed through state agencies. A continuing funding concern is the availability of federal funds for planning activities.


The required federal grant local match comes primarily from the mandated county contribution amount which is based on population according to most recent decennial census. The Commission does not generate its own source revenue.


The 2016 fiscal year continued to be another challenging year, and yet there were significant accomplishments made by the Commission as indicated in the Management’s Discussion and Analysis highlights. The Commission continues to find additional sources of revenue while trying to minimize expenditures. The Commission is poised to address its future in the midst of these challenges.

Acknowledgements


The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) awarded a Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting to the Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission for its comprehensive annual financial report for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2015. In order to be awarded a Certificate of Achievement, a government must publish an easily readable and efficiently organized comprehensive annual financial report. This report must satisfy both generally accepted accounting principles and applicable program requirements.


A Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting is valid for a period of one year only. The Commission believes its current report continues to meet the Certificate of Achievement Program requirements, and it is being submitted to GFOA to determine its eligibility for another certificate.


The preparation of this report could not have been accomplished without the persevering service of the following individuals: Allen Hammond, John Smith, Stephen Sostaric and Meredith Stilwell. Special thanks go to Chief Accountant Kelly Wenger, whose assistance made this report possible.


The Commission would like to thank Indiana State Board of Accounts and especially Sara Prybylla, Lauryn Alyea and Martha Harper, for the timely and through completion of the independent audit report and for their special effort in the development of the 2016 Commission CAFR.


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Sincerely,


Angie Hayes Ty Warner AICP

Chief Financial Officer Executive Director


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Government Finance Officers Association


Certificate of Achievement for Excellence for Financial Reporting


Presented to

Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission


For its Comprehensive Annual Financial Report

for the Fiscal Year Ended


December 31, 2015



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Executive Director/CEO



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Whiting

East Chicago


NORTH


Hammond


Munster

Highland


Gary


CALUMET


Lake Station

New Chicago

2016

COMMISS ION BOARD FROM


Dyer

Griffith Schererville


Merrillville

HOBART

Hobart


ROSS

Lake

ST. JOHN

St. John


HANOVER


Cedar Lake


Lowell


Crown

Point Winfield


CENTER

WINFIELD


LAKE

County EAGLE

CREEK

Coun ty


WEST CREEK


CEDAR CREEK


Schneider


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APP OINTING AUTHORITY MEMBER


Cedar Lake Town Counc il Dyer Town Counc il Griffith Town Counc il Highland Clerk Treas urer

Lake Coun ty Comm iss ioners Lake Coun ty Counc il

Lake Coun ty Surveyor Lake Station

Lowell Town Counc il Mayor of Crown Point Mayor of Eas t Chicago Mayor of Gary

Mayor of Hammond Mayor of Hobart Mayor of Whiting

Me rrillville Town Counc il Munster Clerk Treas urer

New Chicago Clerk Treas urer Schererville Town Counc il

Schneider Town Counc il St. John Town Counc il Winfield Town Counc il

Robert Carnahan Je ff Dekker

Rick Ryfa

Michae l Griffin, Vice Chairperson Kyle W. Allen, Sr.

Christine Cid Bill Emerson, Jr.

Christopher Anderson Will Farrellberg

David Uran

Anthony Copeland, Executive Board Karen Free man-Wilson

Thomas M. McDermott, Jr., Executive Board Brian Snedecor

Jose ph M. Stahura Richard Hardaway Dave Shafer

Lori Reno Tom Schmitt Ja ck Je ra lds

Michae l Forbes Dave Anderson



Ogden Dunes


Dune Acres

WESTCHESTER

Burns Porter

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Town of

Beverly Pines Shores

PINE


2016

COMMISS ION BOARD


Portage

Harbor

Chesterton

FROM


PORTAGE


UNION


LIBERTY


Valparaiso


CENTER


JACKSON


WASHINGTON

Po rter Coun ty


PORTER

PORTER

County

MORGAN


Hebron


BOONE


Kouts


PLEASANT


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APP OINTING AUTHORITY MEMBER


Beverly Shores Town Counc il Burns Harbor Town Counc il Ches te rton Town Counc il Dune Acres Clerk Treas urer Hebron Clerk Treas urer

Kouts Town Counc il Mayor of Portage Mayor of Valparaiso

Ogden Dunes Town Counc il Pines Town Counc il

Porter Coun ty Comm iss ioners Porter Coun ty Counc il

Porter Coun ty Surveyor Porter Town Counc il

Porter Towns hip Trustee Union Towns hip Trustee

Geof Benson, Se cretary Eric Hull

J im Ton, Chairperson Jea nnette Bapst

Fred Siminski Nicole Markovich Ja mes Snyder

H. Jonathan Costas Kathryn Kniola

Vacant Je ff Good

Sylvia Graham

Kevin Breitzke, Executive Board Greg Stinson, Executive Board Edward Morales

George H. Topo ll


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Michiana Shores Long Beach

MICHIGAN

SPRINGFIELD GALENA HUDSON

Michigan

Pottawattomie Park

2016

City Trail Creek


COOL SPRING


NEW DURHAM


Westville

County

LA PORTE

CENTER KANKAKEE


La Porte

PLEASANT


SCIPICO


Kingsbury

WASHINGTON


WILLS


LINCOLN

COMMISS ION BOARD FROM

LaPo rte Coun ty

CLINTON


Wanatah

NOBLE

Kingsford

Heights

UNION

JOHNSON



CASS

HANNA


PRAIRE



La Crosse

DEWEY


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APP OINTING AUTHORITY MEMBER


Kingsbury Town Counc il

Kingsford Heights Clerk-Treas urer La Crosse Town Counc il

LaP orte Coun ty Comm iss ioners LaP orte Coun ty Counc il

LaP orte Coun ty Surveyor Long Bea ch Town Counc il Mayor of La Porte

Mayor of Michigan City

Michiana Shores Town Counc ill

Pottawattomie Pa rk Town Counc il Trail Cree k Town Counc il

Wanatah Town Counc il Wes tville Town Counc il


Governor of Indiana Appointee

Mark Ritter Pa tty Arnett Justin Kiel

Dave Decker, Executive Board Cary Kirkham

Anthony Hendricks Nick Meyer

Blair Milo, Executive Board Ron Mee r

Jea n Poulard Roger Miller John Bayler

Diane Noll, Treas urer Thomas Fath


Ed Soliday, Executive Board



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OUTREACH COMMITTEE

MPO / COG

Comm iss ion

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSISTANCE COMMITTEE COG


ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

POLICY COMMITTEE (EMPC)

COG MPO

Organ izationa l Cha rt

$

GROUP 2

(LAPORTE COUNTY)

LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE COG



LAND USE

COMMITTEE

COG MPO

PED, PEDAL & PADDLE

COMMITTEE (3PC)

COG MPO

OVERSIGHT

C

MPO

ATI

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ITT

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TECHNICAL PLANNING COMMITTEE

(LAKE & PORTER COUNTIES)

NSP

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COG MPO

2040 IMPLEMENTATION COG MPO

GROUP 1

TRA

TRANSIT OPERATORS

ROUNDTABLE

COG MPO

$

13

NIRPC EXECUTIVE BOARD

& COMMISSIONERS


FINANCE AND PERSONNEL COMMITTEE


SURFACE TRANSPORTATION

COMMITTEE (STC)

COG MPO

$ = Comm ittee makes decisions on

Federal Fund ing Transportation Projects


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COMMISS ION S TAFF ORGANIZATIONAL CHART


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Comm iss ion and Execu tive Boa rd


Execu tive Direc tor Ty Warner



DBE Office r- (Collateral Duty)

Pub lic Involvemen t


Allen Hammond

Stephen So s taric


Suppo rt Se rvice

Environmen tal Departmen t Kathy Luthe r

Direc tor of Plann ing


Finance & Adminis tration Angie Hayes


J ody Melton

J oe Exl Amanda Po llard Meredith Stilwell

Mitch Barloga Gabrielle Biciuna s Gary Evers

Sa rah Geino s ky

Eman Ibrah im Mary Tho rne

Suppo rt Se rvice s

Terrell Wadde l Sco tt Webe r

J ohn Smith

Carolyn Brown

Jame s Winters

Finance and Accoun ting

Sub -gran tee Overs igh t

Allen Hammond

Lis a Todd

Kelly Wenge r Conn ie Boos

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Financial


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STATE OF INDIANA

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER STATE BOARD OF ACCOUNTS 302 WEST WASHINGTON STREET

ROOM E418 INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 46204-2769


Telephone: (317) 232-2513

Fax: (317) 232-4711

Web Site: www.in.gov/sboa


INDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S REPORT


TO: THE OFFICIALS OF THE NORTHWESTERN INDIANA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION, LAKE, PORTER, AND LAPORTE COUNTIES, INDIANA


Report on the Financial Statements


We have audited the accompanying financial statements of the governmental activities and each major fund of the Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission (Commission), as of and for the year ended December 31, 2016, and the related notes to the financial statements, which collectively comprise the Commission's basic financial statements as listed in the Table of Contents.


Management's Responsibility for the Financial Statements


Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America; this includes the design, implementation, and maintenance of internal control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.


Auditor's Responsibility


Our responsibility is to express opinions on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America and the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards, issued by the Comptroller General of the United States. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement.


An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and dis- closures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor's judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the Commission's preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Commission's internal control. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of significant account- ing estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial state- ments.


We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinions.

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S REPORT

(Continued)



Opinions


In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the respective financial position of the governmental activities and each major fund of the Commission, as of December 31, 2016, and the respective changes in financial position thereof and for the year then ended, in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.


Other Matters


Required Supplementary Information


Accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America require that the Management's Discussion and Analysis and Budgetary Comparison Schedules, as listed in the Table of Contents, be presented to supplement the basic financial statements. Such information, although not a part of the basic financial statements, is required by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board who considers it to be an essential part of financial reporting for placing the basic financial statements in an appropriate operational, economic, or historical context. We have applied certain limited procedures to the required supplementary information in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America, which consisted of inquiries of management about the methods of preparing the information and comparing the information for consistency with management's responses to our inquiries, the basic financial statements, and other knowledge we obtained during our audit of the basic financial statements. We do not express an opinion or provide any assurance on the information because the limited procedures do not provide us with sufficient evidence to express an opinion or provide any assurance.


Other Information


Our audit was conducted for the purpose of forming opinions on the financial statements that col- lectively comprise the Commission's basic financial statements. The accompanying Budgetary Comparison Schedule - Transit Capital, the Introductory and Statistical Sections, and the Schedule of Expenditures of Federal Awards, as required by Title 2 U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, are presented for purposes of additional analysis and are not required parts of the basic financial statements.


The Budgetary Comparison Schedule - Transit Capital and the Schedule of Expenditures of Federal Awards are the responsibility of management and were derived from and relate directly to the underlying accounting and other records used to prepare the basic financial statements. Such information has been subjected to the auditing procedures applied in the audit of the basic financial statements and certain additional procedures, including comparing and reconciling such information directly to the underlying accounting and other records used to prepare the basic financial statements or to the basic financial state- ments themselves, and other additional procedures in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. In our opinion, the Budgetary Comparison Schedule - Transit Capital and the Schedule of Expenditures of Federal Awards are fairly stated, in all material respects, in relation to the basic financial statements as a whole.


The Introductory and Statistical Sections have not been subjected to the auditing procedures applied in the audit of the basic financial statements and, accordingly, we do not express an opinion or provide any assurance on it.

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S REPORT

(Continued)


Other Reporting Required by Government Auditing Standards


In accordance with Government Auditing Standards, we have also issued our report dated May 30, 2017, on our consideration of the Commission's internal control over financial reporting and on our tests of its compliance with certain provisions of laws, regulations, contracts, and grant agreements and other matters. The purpose of that report is to describe the scope of our testing of internal control over financial reporting and compliance and the results of that testing, and not to provide an opinion on internal control over financial reporting or on compliance. That report is an integral part of an audit performed in accordance with Government Auditing Standards in considering the Commission's internal control over financial reporting and compliance.


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Paul D. Joyce, CPA State Examiner



May 30, 2017


This Page is Intentionally Blank

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS (MD&A)


The Commission offers readers this narrative overview and analysis of the financial activities for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016. Readers are encouraged to consider this information in conjunction with additional information furnished in the basic financial statements and notes to the financial statements to enhance understanding of the Commission’s financial performance.


Financial Highlights



Overview of the Financial Statements


This discussion and analysis is intended to serve as an introduction to the Commission’s basic financial statements. The Commission’s basic financial statements comprise of three components:

  1. government-wide financial statements, 2) fund financial statements, and 3) notes to the financial statements. This report also contains other supplementary information in addition to the basic financial statements themselves.


    Government-Wide Financial Statements


    The government-wide financial statements are designed to provide readers with a broad overview of the Commission’s finances, in a manner similar to a private-sector business.


    The statement of net position presents information on all the Commission’s assets, liabilities, and deferred inflows/outflows of resources, with the difference between the two reported as net position. Over time, increases or decreases in net position may serve as a useful indicator of whether the financial position of the Commission is improving or deteriorating.


    The statement of activities presents information showing how the Commission’s net position changed during the most recent fiscal year. All changes in net position are reported as soon as the underlying event giving rise to the change occurs, regardless of the timing of related cash flows. Thus, revenues and expenses are reported in this statement for some items that will only result in cash flows in future fiscal periods.


    Both of the government-wide financial statements distinguish functions of the Commission that are principally supported by intergovernmental revenues (government activities). The Commission does not have business type activities.


    Fund Financial Statements


    A fund is a grouping of related accounts that is used to maintain control over resources that have been segregated for specific activities. The Commission, like other state and local governments, uses fund accounting to ensure and demonstrate compliance with finance-related legal requirements. All of the funds of the Commission are governmental funds.

    Governmental Funds


    Governmental Funds are used to account for essentially the same functions reported as governmental activities in the government-wide financial statements. However, unlike the government-wide financial statements, governmental fund financial statements focus on near-term inflows and outflows of spendable resources, as well as on balances of spendable resources available at the end of the fiscal year. Such information may be useful in evaluating a government’s near-term financing requirements.


    General Government Revenues


    Because the focus of governmental funds is narrower than that of the government-wide financial statements, it is useful to compare the information presented for governmental funds with similar information presented for governmental activities in the government-wide financial statements. By doing so, readers may better understand the long-term impact of the government’s near-term financing decisions. Both the governmental fund balance sheet and the governmental fund statement of revenues, expenditures, and changes in fund balances provide a reconciliation to facilitate this comparison between governmental funds and governmental activities.


    The Commission maintains four individual governmental funds. Information is presented separately in the governmental fund balance sheet and in the governmental fund statement of revenues, expenditures, and changes in fund balances for all four funds.


    The Commission adopts an annual budget for the four individual governmental funds. A budgetary comparison statement has been provided for all four funds to demonstrate compliance with the budget.


    Notes to the Financial Statements


    The notes provide additional information that is essential to a full understanding of the data provided in the government-wide and fund financial statements.


    Government-Wide Overall Financial Analysis


    As noted earlier, net position may serve over time as a useful indicator of a government’s financial position. In the case of the Commission, assets exceed liabilities by $4,271,844 at the year ending December 31, 2016.

    The Commission’s Net Position


    The following table reflects a summary of Net Position compared to the prior year.


    Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission

    Statement of Net Position

    2016

    2015

    Current and Other Assets

    $ 2,852,335

    $ 2,706,384

    Capital Assets

    3,308,757

    3,167,949

    Total Assets

    $ 6,161,092

    $ 5,874,333

    Deferred Outflows of Resources

    $ 495,096

    $ 440,529

    Long-term Liabilities

    1,355,733

    1,170,951

    Other Liabilities

    939,439

    827,184

    Total Liabilities

    $ 2,295,172

    $ 1,998,135

    Deferred Inflows of Resources

    $ 89,172

    $ 105,659

    Net Position:

    Investment in Capital Assets

    3,308,757

    3,167,949

    Restricted

    501,980

    495,847

    Unrestricted

    461,106

    547,272

    Total Net Position

    $ 4,271,844

    $ 4,211,068


    Summary of Changes in Net Position


    The following table summarizes the changes in net position for the current and previous year.

    Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission Changes in Net Position


    REVENUES

    2016

    2015

    Program Revenues:

    Operating Grants and Contributions

    $ 5,602,038

    $ 5,280,329

    Capital Grants and Contributions

    1,256,803

    1,154,881

    General Revenues:

    County Contributions not restricted 540,271 540,271 to specific purposes

    Unassigned Interest Income

    11,935

    5,790

    Total Revenues

    $ 7,411,047

    $ 6,981,271

    EXPENSES

    Planning and Development


    3,188,387


    3,131,609

    Transit Operating

    3,011,314

    2,739,753

    Transit Capital

    1,150,265

    1,231,002

    Total Expenses

    $ 7,349,966

    $ 7,102,364

    Changes in net position

    61,081

    (121,093)

    Net Position - Beginning, Restated

    4,210,763

    4,332,161

    Net Position - Ending

    $ 4,271,844

    $ 4,211,068


    Analysis of Overall Financial Position and Results of Operations


    Capital assets are used to provide services to citizens and they are not available for future spending. Approximately 77% of the Commission’s net position reflects its investment in capital assets (e.g., machinery, equipment, and vehicles). The Commission does not own any real property or infrastructure. It should be noted that all capital assets owned by the Commission are free of debt and do not require additional resources.


    Current and other assets consist mainly of cash, receivables from intergovernmental sources, and interest. Long-term liabilities consist of compensated absences and net pension obligation.


    The Commission’s net position increased by $61,081 during the current fiscal year due to increases in capital assets and interest income.


    Financial Analysis of the Government’s Funds


    As noted earlier, the Commission uses fund accounting to ensure and demonstrate compliance with finance-related legal requirements.


    Governmental Funds


    The focus of the Commission’s governmental funds is to provide information on near-term inflows, outflows, and balances of spendable resources. Such information is useful in assessing the Commission’s financing requirements. In particular, unassigned fund balance may serve as a useful measure of a government’s net resources available for spending at the end of the fiscal year.


    As of the end of the current fiscal year, the Commission’s governmental funds reported combined ending fund balances of $1,921,934, an increase of $34,532 in comparison with the prior year. 74% of this total amount, $1,419,953, constitutes unassigned fund balance which is available for

    spending at the government’s discretion. The remainder of the fund balance, $501,981 is not available for spending because it has been restricted for economic development.


    The general fund is the chief operating fund of the Commission. At the end of the current fiscal year, the unassigned fund balance amount of $1,419,953 is in the Commission’s general fund. As a measure of the general fund’s liquidity, it may be useful to compare both unassigned fund balance and total fund balance to total general fund expenditures.


    The fund balance of the Commission’s general fund increased by $28,400 during the current fiscal year. Key factors in this increase are as follows:


    The indirect costs were within budget based on the allocation rate of 85% in the 2016 Cost Allocation Plan. Additionally, more direct salaries were charged to grants than to indirect salaries which increased the amount reimbursed for indirect costs.


    image

    The charts below note the sources of the Commission’s general fund operating revenues and operating expenses.


    Commission 2016 Operating Revenue

    General Fund



    6%3%

    17%

    County Appropriations

    Federal Agencies


    17%

    57%

    State Agencies

    Local Agencies

    Other Income/Interest


    Commission 2016 Operating Expenses

    General Fund



    1%


    31%

    Personnel Services Salaries

    48% Personnel Services - Fringe benefits Other Services & Charges

    Capital Outlays


    20%


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    The LaPorte revolving loan fund accounts for the revolving loan program activities. The fund balance increased for 2016 due to closing cost and loan interest revenues. One loan was paid off by the borrower, Millstone Mills, Inc. A new loan for Wilson’s Barbershop and Shave Parlor was closed in 2016 and was paid from sequestered funds with permission from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Economic Development Administration. For 2016, there was no requirement to sequester any additional funds. The fund had no delinquent loan write-offs in 2016.


    The transit operating fund is used to account for the reimbursement of operation expenses for subrecipients providing public transit. The Commission itself does not operate public transit but is the direct recipient for these funds. As expected, this fund balance has remained consistent with the 2015 balance.


    The transit capital fund is used to account for the purchase of capital equipment and facilities used for public transit. The funding for these purchases is provided by both Federal Transit Administration and the subrecipient operating the capital equipment. The Commission does not cover any costs associated with the purchase of the capital equipment in this fund. In order for the Commission to safeguard the federal interest, the Commission retains title to all federally funded capital equipment. As expected, this fund balance has remained consistent with the 2015 balance.


    Budgetary Highlights General Fund

    The Commission’s general fund is budgeted annually for general operating expenses. During the year, there were no significant variations between both the original general fund budget and the final amended budget and the actual results.


    Capital Assets


    The Commission’s investment in capital assets for its governmental activities as of December 31, 2016, amounts to $3,308,757 (net of accumulated depreciation). This investment in capital assets includes intangibles, vehicles, machinery, office equipment, and computer equipment. The Commission does not own land, buildings, or infrastructure assets.


    The total increase in the Commission’s assets for the current fiscal year was $140,808. A detailed note of these capital assets can be found in the Notes to the Financial Statements (Note III D).


    There were no major capital asset events during the current fiscal year.


    Capital Assets

    2016

    2015

    Intangible Assets

    $ 10,828

    $ 10,828

    Total Intangible Assets

    10,828

    10,828

    Capital Assets Net of

    Depreciation

    Vehicle

    3,189,755

    2,996,127

    Transit machinery

    97,759

    160,994

    Office and computer

    equipment

    10,415

    -

    Total Capital Assets

    Net of Depreciation

    $ 3,297,929

    $ 3,157,121

    Total Capital Assets

    $ 3,308,757

    $ 3,167,949


    Long-term Debt


    The Commission carries no long term debt.


    Economic Factors and Next Year’s Budget


    All these factors were considered in preparing the Commission’s general fund budget for the 2017 fiscal year.



Requests for Information


This financial report is designed to provide a general overview of the Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission’s finances for all those with an interest in the government’s finances. Questions concerning any of the information provided in this report or requests for additional financial information should be addressed to Director of Finance, 6100 Southport Road, Portage, IN 46368 or by email at nirpc@nirpc.org.

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Basic Financial Statements

image


Government-Wide Financial Statements


30


NORTHWESTERN INDIANA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION STATEMENT OF NET POSITION

DECEMBER 31, 2016


GOVERNMENTAL ACTIVITIES

ASSETS

Cash and cash equivalents


$ 746,305

Accounts receivable

853,724

RESTRICTED ASSETS:

Cash and cash equivalents

879,114

Accounts receivable

59,733

Loan receivable

313,459

CAPITAL ASSETS AND INTANGIBLE ASSETS

Intangible Non-Depreciable

10,828

Machinery and Equipment, Net of Depreciation

3,297,929

TOTAL ASSETS

6,161,092


DEFERRED OUTFLOWS OF RESOURCES

Deferred pension 495,096

TOTAL DEFERRED OUTFLOWS OF RESOURCES 495,096


LIABILITIES

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE


Payable from restricted assets

70,601

Payable from nonrestricted assets

180,076

UNEARNED REVENUES NONCURRENT LIABILITIES

679,724

Amounts due within one year:

Compensated absences 9,038

Amounts due beyond one year:


Compensated absences

81,338

Net pension liability

1,274,395

TOTAL LIABILITIES

2,295,172


DEFERRED INFLOWS OF RESOURCES

Deferred pension 89,172

TOTAL DEFERRED INFLOWS OF RESOURCES 89,172


NET POSITION


INVESTMENT IN CAPITAL ASSETS

3,308,757

RESTRICTED:

Economic Development

501,981

UNRESTRICTED

461,106

TOTAL NET POSITION

$ 4,271,844


The notes to the financial statements are an integral part of this statement.



NORTHWESTERN INDIANA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES

FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2016



Program Revenues

Net (Expense) Revenue and Changes in Net

Position

Operating Capital Total Grants and Grants and Governmental

Functions/Programs Expenses Contributions Contributions Activities


Governmental Activities Planning and Development


$ 3,188,387 $


2,590,724 $


- $ (597,663)

Transit Operating 3,011,314 3,011,314 - - Transit Capital 1,150,265 - 1,256,803 106,538


Total Governmental Activities

$ 7,349,966

$ 5,602,038

$ 1,256,803

(491,125)


image image image


General Revenues

Unassigned County Contributions 540,271 Unassigned Interest Income 11,935


Total Revenues 552,206


Change in Net Position 61,081


Net Position - Beginning 4,211,068

Prior period adjustment (Note III. F) (305)


Restated net position - beginning 4,210,763


Net Position - Ending


The notes to the financial statements are an integral part of this statement.

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$ 4,271,844

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Fund Financial Statements


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NORTHWESTERN INDIANA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION BALANCE SHEET

GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS DECEMBER 31, 2016


Total

Transit Transit Governmental

General LaPorte RLF Operating Capital Funds


ASSETS


Cash and cash equivalents

$ 746,305

$ - $ - $ - $ 746,305

Accounts receivable

853,724

- - - 853,724

RESTRICTED ASSETS:


Cash and cash equivalents

210,346

188,522

- 480,246

879,114

Accounts receivable

-

-

- 59,733

59,733

Loan receivable

-

313,459

- -

313,459

TOTAL ASSETS

$ 1,810,375

$ 501,981

$ - $ 539,979

$ 2,852,335

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LIABILITIES

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE


Payable from restricted assets

$ 6,235

$ - $ - $ 64,366

$ 70,601

Payable from nonrestricted assets

89,951

- - -

89,951

PAYROLL AND WITHHOLDINGS PAYABLE

90,125

- - -

90,125

UNEARNED REVENUES

204,111

- - 475,613

679,724

TOTAL LIABILITIES

390,422

- - 539,979

930,401

FUND BALANCES

Restricted for:


Economic Development

- 501,981

- - 501,981

Unassigned

1,419,953 -

- - 1,419,953

TOTAL FUND BALANCES

1,419,953 501,981

- - 1,921,934


TOTAL LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCES

$ 1,810,375

$ 501,981 $

- $ 539,979

image image image image


Amounts reported for governmental activities in the statement of net position are different because:

Capital assets used in governmental activities are not financial resources and therefore, are not reported in the funds.

Machinery and Equipment, Net of Depreciation

3,297,929

Intangible Non-Depreciable

10,828

Total Capital Assets

3,308,757


Compensated absences, a form of liability, are not due and payable in the current period

and therefore are not reported in the funds.

(90,376)

Deferred outflows and inflows related to pension obligations are included in the governmental

activities in the statement of net position.

405,924

Net pension obligation, a form of liability, are not due and payable in the current period

and therefore are not reported in the funds.

(1,274,395)

Net position of governmental activities


The notes to the financial statements are an integral part of this statement.

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$ 4,271,844


NORTHWESTERN INDIANA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES

GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS

FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2016


Total

Transit Transit Governmental

General LaPorte RLF Operating Capital Funds


REVENUES


INTERGOVERNMENTAL - COUNTY APPROPRIATIONS

$ 540,271

$ - $ -

$ -

$ 540,271

INTERGOVERNMENTAL - FEDERAL AGENCIES

546,907

- 2,487,921

1,053,313

4,088,141

INTERGOVERNMENTAL - STATE AGENCIES

1,773,021

- 523,393

-

2,296,414

INTERGOVERNMENTAL - LOCAL AGENCIES

189,138

- -

111,900

301,038

NON-GOVERNMENTAL

85,268

- -

91,590

176,858

INTEREST INCOME

2,193

9,742 -

-

11,935


TOTAL REVENUES 3,136,798 9,742 3,011,314 1,256,803 7,414,657


EXPENDITURES

CURRENT - PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT


PERSONNEL SERVICES - SALARIES

1,482,669

-

-

- 1,482,669

PERSONNEL SERVICES - FRINGE BENEFITS

630,384

-

-

- 630,384

OTHER SERVICES AND CHARGES

961,075

3,610

3,011,314

- 3,975,999

CAPITAL OUTLAYS

34,270

-

-

1,256,803 1,291,073


TOTAL EXPENDITURES 3,108,398 3,610 3,011,314 1,256,803 7,380,125


EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUES OVER

(UNDER) EXPENDITURES 28,400 6,132 - - 34,532


FUND BALANCE - BEGINNING

1,391,553

495,849

- - 1,887,402

FUND BALANCE - ENDING

$ 1,419,953

$ 501,981

image

$ - $ - $ 1,921,934


image

Amounts reported for governmental activities in the Statement of Activities are different because:


Net change in fund balances - total governmental funds (Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and

Changes in Fund Balance)

34,532

Governmental funds report capital outlays as expenditures. However, in the Statement of Activities the cost of those assets is allocated over their estimated lives and reported as depreciation expense. This is the amount by which depreciation exceeded capital outlays in the current period.

Expenditures for capital assets 1,209,192

Less current year depreciation expense (1,049,825)

Less reduction in accumulated depreciation related to disposal of assets (18,559)


140,808

Some expenses reported in the Statement of Activities do not require the use of current financial resources and are therefore not reported as expenditures in governmental funds. This is the amount by which compensated absences increased

in the current period.


(5,307)

Some expenses reported in the Statement of Activities do not require the use of current financial resources and are therefore not reported as expenditures in governmental funds. This is the amount by which net pension liability increased

in the current period.



2015

2016

Increase in deferred pension liability

$ 1,094,389

$ (1,274,395)

(180,006)

Net deferred outflows of resources for deferred pension

(440,529)

(495,096)

54,567

Deferred inflows of resources for deferred pension

105,659

(89,172)

16,487


(108,952)

Change in net position of governmental activities (Statement of Activities):


The notes to the financial statements are an integral part of this statement.


image

$ 61,081

NORTHWESTERN INDIANA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION

Notes to the Financial Statements December 31, 2016


  1. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES


    The financial statements of the Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (GAAP) as applied to governmental units. The Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) is the accepted standard-setting body for establishing governmental accounting and financial reporting principles. A summary of the Commission’s more significant accounting policies which have been consistently applied in the preparation of the accompanying financial statements is presented as follows:


    1. ORGANIZATION OF THE REPORTING ENTITY


      The Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission (Commission) operates as a separate legal entity under provisions of the Indiana Code (Title 36, Article VII, Chapter 7.6). Its primary mission is planning and development coordination in northwestern Indiana, which includes Lake, Porter, and LaPorte Counties. Legislation enacted into law during 2007 changed the composition of the Commission. The governing body of the Commission currently consists of fifty-three members. Members are appointed by the counties, cities and towns within northwestern Indiana according to the provisions of the enabling legislation. Each county makes three appointments; each city and town appoints one member. All members must be elected officials. Members serve until replaced by the appointing authorities, which are typically the chief elected executive officials of the individual cities and towns and specified county officials. The Commission itself cannot remove a member for any reason.


      According to state legislation, each of the three counties must make a mandatory appropriation to the Commission in an amount equal to seventy cents per capita. Counties voluntarily may make contributions in excess of this amount. The Commission selects and employs its Executive Director, controls the hiring of its employees and is responsible for its overall fiscal management. No other entity is responsible for the legal obligations of the Commission.


      The enabling legislation under which the Commission was established provides for an appointing and funding process that is sufficient to support the conclusion that the Commission is not accountable to any other single unit of government. The Commission is a primary unit; it has no component units.


    2. GOVERNMENT-WIDE AND FUND FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


      Government-wide financial statements (i.e., the Statement of Net Position and the Statement of Activities) report information on all of the activities of the Commission. Under governmental accounting standards, governmental activities, which normally are supported by taxes and intergovernmental revenues are reported separately from business-type activities which rely to a significant extent on fees and charges for support. The Commission does not have what are normally considered business-type activities.


      The Statement of Activities demonstrates the degree to which direct expenses of a given function or segments are offset by program revenues. Direct expenses are clearly identifiable with a specific function or segment. Program revenues include grants and contributions that are restricted to meeting the operational or capital requirements of a particular function or segment. Other items not properly included among program revenues are reported instead as general revenues.

      The Commission has only governmental type funds. Major individual governmental funds are reported as separate columns in the fund financial statements.


    3. MEASUREMENT FOCUS, BASIS OF ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT PRESENTATION


      The government-wide financial statements are reported using the economic resources measurement focus and the accrual basis of accounting. Revenues are recorded when earned and expenses are recorded when a liability is incurred, regardless of the timing of the related cash flows. Revenues from cost reimbursable grants, contracts or similar agreements are recognized when expenditures are made or as soon as all eligibility requirements imposed by the provider have been met. The Commission occasionally reports unearned revenues that arise when resources are received by the Commission before it has a legal claim to them, such as when grant or contract monies are received prior to the incurrence of qualifying expenditures. In subsequent periods or when the Commission has a legal claim to the resources, the liability for unearned revenues is removed from the combined balance sheet and revenue is recognized.


      Governmental fund financial statements are reported using the current financial resources measurement focus and modified accrual basis of accounting. Revenues are recognized as soon as they are both measurable and available. Federal grants are the major source of revenue and considered available once grant agreements are executed. Revenues are considered to be available when they are collectible in the current period or soon enough thereafter to pay liabilities of the current period. For this purpose, the Commission considers revenues to be available if they are collected within sixty days of the end of the current fiscal period. Expenditures are generally recorded when a liability is incurred, as under accrual accounting.


      The Commission has established the following major governmental funds:


      General Fund: The general fund is the general operating fund of the Commission. It is used to account for all financial resources not accounted for and reported in another fund. The revenues received support the Commission’s general operation as well as specific programs relating to the Commission’s primary mission of planning and development coordination.


      Special Revenue Funds: Special revenue funds are used to account for and report the proceeds of specific revenue sources that are restricted or committed to expenditure for specified purposes other than debt service or capital projects. Special revenue funds are designed to help determine and demonstrate that resources that must be used for a specified purpose are, in fact, used for that purpose. At the core of each special revenue fund must be resources derived from one or more specific revenue sources. The Commission has two special revenue funds:


      LaPorte Revolving Loan Fund: This special revenue fund is used to account for the restricted financial resources that are used in conjunction with a revolving loan program which is regulated by the Economic Development Administration. The purpose of the revolving loan program is to foster economic growth and development by providing below market loans to businesses and industries locating or expanding operations within LaPorte County. This special revenue fund is used to issue loans and receipt in the principal and interest payments from those loans. Payments received are distributed as identified in the mandated management plan for the program.


      Transit Operating Fund: This special revenue fund is used to account for financial resources that are received from other governmental units and are provided to entities which operate public transportation service within northwestern Indiana.

      Capital Projects Fund: Capital project funds are used to account for and report financial resources that are restricted, committed, or assigned to expenditure for capital outlays, including the acquisition or construction of capital facilities and other capital assets. Capital project funds exclude those types of capital-related outflows financed by proprietary funds or for assets that will be held in trust for individuals, private organizations, or other governments.


      Transit Capital Fund: This capital projects fund is a governmental type fund which is used to account for the financial resources that are used in the acquisition or purchase of capital equipment and facilities used for public transit. The acquisition or purchase of operating equipment is accounted for in the general fund.


    4. ASSETS, LIABILITIES AND NET POSITION


      1. Deposits and Investments


        The Commission’s cash and cash equivalents are considered to be cash on hand, demand deposits and short-term investments with original maturities of three months or less from the date of acquisition.


        State statute (IC 5-13-9) authorizes the Commission to invest in securities, including but not limited to, federal government securities, repurchase agreements, and certain money market mutual funds. Certain other statutory restrictions apply to all investments made by local government units.


      2. Capital Assets


        Capital assets, which include property, plant, equipment and infrastructure assets (e.g. roads, bridges, sidewalks and similar items), are reported in the applicable governmental type activities column in the government-wide statements. The Commission does not own real property or infrastructure assets.


        Capital assets are reported at actual or estimated historical cost based on appraisals or deflated current replacement cost. Contributed or donated assets are reported at estimated fair value at the time received. The costs of normal maintenance and repairs that do not add to the value of the asset or materially extend the useful life of an asset are not capitalized.


        Statement No. 51 of the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB), Accounting and Financial Reporting for Intangible Assets requires that intangible assets be classified as capital assets. For example, licensed financial accounting software that the government modifies to add special reporting capabilities would be considered internally generated software and is therefore an intangible asset. An intangible asset should be depreciated over the estimated useful life unless the intangible asset has an indefinite useful life. The Commission now owns an intangible asset.


        The capitalization threshold (the dollar value above which asset acquisitions are added to the capital asset accounts) used by the Commission is $5,000 (amount not rounded) and an estimated useful life in excess of one year. Computer and similar equipment that does not meet the threshold and useful life test, is not depreciated but maintained as an inventory item.


        The Commission’s equipment is depreciated using the straight line method of depreciation based on the following estimated useful lives:


        Vehicles 4-12 Years

        Office Equipment 4-6 Years

        Computer Equipment 3 Years

      3. Compensated Absences


        It is the Commission’s policy to permit employees to accumulate earned but not used vacation and personal leave time. There is no liability for unpaid accumulated personal leave since the Commission does not have a policy to pay any amounts when employees separate from service with the Commission. Vacation pay is accrued when incurred in the government-wide financial statements. Vacation time is earned at the rate of 9-20 days per year based on the number of years of service. A maximum of 30 days may be accrued at the end of any annual reporting period.


      4. Fund Balance


        Fund balance for governmental funds should be reported in classifications that comprise a hierarchy on the extent to which the government is bound to honor constraints on the specific purposes for which amounts in those funds can be spent.


        The classifications should depict the nature of the net resources that are reported in a governmental fund. The fund balance classifications are reported as follows: restricted, committed, assigned, nonspendable, and unassigned.


        1. The restricted fund balance category includes amounts that can be spent only for the specific purposes stipulated by constitution, external resource providers, or through enabling legislation.


        2. The committed fund balance category includes amounts that can be spent only for the specific purposes determined by a formal action of the Commission’s Board.


        3. The assigned fund balance category includes amounts that are constrained by the Commission’s intent to be used for a specific purpose, but are neither restricted nor committed.


        4. The nonspendable fund balance category includes amounts that cannot be spent because they are either (a) not in spendable form or (b) legally or contractually required to be maintained intact. The not in spendable form criterion includes items that are not expected to be converted to cash for example as inventories and prepaid amounts.


        5. The unassigned fund balance category is the residual classification for the government’s general fund and includes all spendable amounts not contained in the other classifications.


        The Commission has the following fund classifications: restricted and unassigned.


        The Commission considers restricted or unrestricted amounts to have been spent when an expenditure is incurred for purposes for which both restricted and unrestricted fund balance is available. The Commission’s policy is to spend the restricted balances first before spending any unrestricted funds. Likewise, committed amounts would be reduced first, followed by assigned amounts, and then unassigned amounts when expenditures are incurred for purposes for which amounts in any of those unrestricted fund balance classifications could be used.


        For the government-wide financial statements, net position is reported in three separate categories: investment in capital assets, net position–restricted, and net position–

        unrestricted. The financial statements report $1,252,306 of restricted assets, of which $0 is restricted by enabling legislation.

        In the Commission’s financial statements, restricted assets of $1,252,306 do not agree with the reported restricted net position of $501,981. The difference is due to liabilities payable from restricted assets and unearned revenues totaling $750,325.


      5. Allocated Costs


        Under provisions of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular 2 CFR Part 200, the Commission allocates to each program activity those costs which are “(a) incurred for a common or joint purpose benefiting more than one cost objective, and (b) not readily assignable to the cost objectives specifically benefited, without effort disproportionate to the results achieved”.


        There are two categories of costs which are allocated. The first is fringe benefits which includes the employer’s cost of providing paid time off such as vacation, sick, personal, holiday, other leave (jury duty, military and funeral) and various types of insurance, retirement benefits, and social security taxes. The second is indirect costs, which includes those costs related to general management, finance and accounting, office operation and maintenance, and support services.


        The vehicle utilized to allocate costs is an indirect cost allocation plan which is prepared at the beginning of each year and establishes allocation rates based on prior experience and anticipated program effort. This plan is prepared by the Commission and is negotiated with the “cognizant federal agency for indirect costs” which for the past several years has been the Federal Highway Administration of the U.S. Department of Transportation working through the Indiana Department of Transportation. Allocated rates are established in this plan, which are used for billing purposes throughout the year. Upon the completion of an independent audit at the end of each year, final allocation rates are established based on actual costs. When actual costs are less than the amounts previously allocated, revenue is reduced and a liability is recognized.


        During 2016, the Commission’s allocation rates were as follows:


        Fringe Benefits 93% of total direct salaries and wages

        Other Indirect Costs 85% of total direct personnel


      6. Non-Governmental Accounts


        Occasionally the Commission provides contractual services to non-governmental entities primarily not-for-profit agencies. The most common example of this occurs when the Commission acquires transit vehicles for such agencies through its Transit Capital Fund. In this circumstance, as well as other cases where a non-governmental entity provides revenue, it is reported under the heading “non-governmental accounts”.


  2. STEWARDSHIP, COMPLIANCE AND ACCOUNTABILITY


    1. BUDGETARY INFORMATION


      Annual budgets for the governmental funds are adopted on a basis consistent with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. These funds include the Commission’s general fund, its special revenue funds (the LaPorte Revolving Loan (RLF) Fund, and the Transit Operating Fund) and its one capital projects fund (the Transit Capital Fund). A proposed budget for the ensuing year is submitted to the Commission by the Executive Director. This usually occurs at the fourth quarterly meeting of the Commission which is typically held in October. The Commission may vote to adopt the budget at this meeting, or may call a special meeting to take action on the budget. The budget as adopted by the Commission is organized

      by object class categories. Major object class categories (which typically include salaries, fringe benefits, occupancy, equipment service and maintenance, departmental, contractual, and capital outlays) represent the legal level of control. Amendments to the adopted budget may be made only by the Commission at any regular meeting of the Commission or at any special meeting of the Commission called to consider the budget. The Commission has established a Finance and Personnel Committee composed exclusively of Commission members appointed by the Chair. This Committee exercises financial oversight over Commission operations and establishes more detailed accounts. Amounts presented in the financial statements are the final budget amounts for the year, as legally amended. No supplemental budgetary appropriations were made during the year ended December 31, 2016. Encumbrance accounting, under which purchase orders, contracts or other commitments for the expenditure of resources are recorded in order to reserve that portion of a relevant appropriation, is employed as an extension of the Commission’s formal budgeting process in the governmental funds. Encumbrances outstanding at year-end are reported as restricted fund balances since they do not constitute expenditures or liabilities. All appropriations lapse at year-end. Outstanding encumbrances at year-end are re-appropriated in the ensuing year. The Commission had no outstanding encumbrances at year-end.


  3. DETAILED NOTES ON ALL FUNDS


    1. DEPOSITS


      Custodial credit risk is the risk that in the event of a bank failure, the government's deposits may not be returned to it. Indiana Code 5-13-8-1 allows a political subdivision of the State of Indiana to deposit public funds in a financial institution only if the financial institution is a depository eligible to receive state funds; and has a principal office or branch that qualifies to receive public funds of the political subdivision. The bank balances were insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or the Public Deposit Insurance Fund, which covers all public funds held in approved depositories. The Commission does not have a custodial credit risk policy, other than to follow the statues.


      At year end, the Commission’s carrying amount of deposits was $1,625,419.


      As of December 31, 2016, the entire amount reported as cash and cash equivalents on the statement of net position and the balance sheet was in the form of demand deposits.


    2. INVESTMENTS


      Authorization for investment activity is stated in Indiana Code 5-13. As of December 31, 2016, the Commission had no investments.


    3. OPERATING LEASES


      The Commission leases office facilities, postage equipment, and copier equipment under non- cancelable operating leases. Total costs for such leases were $238,867 for the year ended December 31, 2016. The future minimum lease payments for these leases are as follows:


      Dec ember 31,

      Office

      Copiers

      Phones

      Total

      2017

      209,215

      20,655

      2,085

      231,955

      2018

      214,446

      20,655

      -

      235,101

      2019

      219,807

      12,049

      -

      231,856

      $ 643,468

      $ 53,359

      $ 2,085

      $ 698,912

    4. CAPITAL ASSETS


      Capital asset activity for the year ended December 31, 2016 was as follows:


      Beginning

      Ending

      Governmental activities:

      Balanc e

      Inc reases

      Dec reases

      Balanc e

      Capital assets not being depreciated:

      Intangibles

      $ 10,828

      $ -

      $ -

      $ 10,828

      Total capital assets not being

      depreciated

      10,828

      -

      -

      10,828

      Capital assets being depreciated:

      Machinery and Equipment

      9,110,842

      1,209,192

      1,214,945

      9,105,089

      Less accumulated depreciation for:

      Machinery and Equipment

      5,953,721

      1,049,825

      1,196,386

      5,807,160

      Net capital assets being

      depreciated

      3,157,121

      159,367

      18,559

      3,297,929

      Total governmental activity

      Capital assets, net

      $ 3,167,949

      $ 140,808

      $ -

      $ 3,308,757


      Depreciation expense was charged to functions/programs of the Commission as follows:


      Governmental activities:

      Planning and Development Activities $ 1,376 Transit Capital 1,048,449


      Total depreciation expense $1,049,825



    5. LONG-TERM LIABILITIES


      Changes in long-term liabilities for the Commission for the year ended December 31, 2016 were as follows:



      Changes in Long-Term Liabilities


      Beginning Balance


      Increases


      Decreases


      Ending Balance

      Amounts Due Within

      One Year


      Amounts Due Thereafter

      Government activities:

      Compensated absences

      $ 85,069

      $ 25,477

      $

      (20,170)

      $ 90,376

      $

      9,038

      $ 81,338

      Net pension liability

      $ 1,094,389

      $ 180,006

      $

      -

      $ 1,274,395

      $

      -

      $ 1,274,395


      The General Fund typically has been used to liquidate any long-term liabilities.


    6. PRIOR PERIOD ADJUSTMENT


      For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2015, certain changes have been made to the financial statement to more appropriately reflect financial activity. The prior period adjustment reflects the

      correction from an overstatement of both the expenses and payable accounts for the general fund in the amount of $305. The prior period adjustment is reflected in the Statement of Activities.


  4. OTHER INFORMATION


    1. RISK MANAGEMENT


      The Commission is exposed to various risks of loss related to torts; theft of, damage to and destruction of assets; job related illnesses or injuries to employees; medical benefits to employees and dependents, and natural disasters for which the Commission carries commercial insurance from independent third parties. There were no significant reductions in insurance coverage in the prior year. The amounts of settlements have not exceeded insurance coverage for any of the past three fiscal years.


    2. CONTINGENT LIABILITIES


      Amounts received or receivable from grant agencies are subject to audit and adjustment by grantor agencies, principally the federal government. Any disallowed claims, including amounts already collected, may constitute a liability of the applicable funds. The amount, if any, of expenditures that may be disallowed by the grantor cannot be determined at this time, although the Commission expects such amounts, if any, to be immaterial.


    3. COST-SHARING MULTIPLE-EMPLOYER DEFINED BENEFIT PENSION PLAN - PUBLIC EMPLOYEES’ RETIREMENT FUND


      Plan Description

      The Public Employees’ Retirement Fund (PERF) provides pensions for all full-time Commission employees. The plan is a cost-sharing multiple-employer defined benefit plan administered by the Indiana Public Retirement System (INPRS). The pension system issues a publicly available financial report that can be obtained at www.inprs.in.gov


      Benefits Provided


      The plan provides retirement, disability and survivor benefits. The Indiana Code, Title 5, Articles

      10.2 and 10.3, as amended only by the Indiana General Assembly, identifies the benefit provisions and establishes the authority under which employees and employers are obligated to contribute to the plan.


      Retirement benefits for employees are calculated as years of credible service times the average highest 20 quarters of salary times I.I% plus the employee's Annuity Savings Account. Normal retirement age is 60 with early retirement at 50-59 with 15 years of service. Vesting period is 10 years. An employee who leaves service may withdraw his or her Annuity Savings Account contributions, plus any accumulated interest.


      Benefit terms provide for annual cost of living adjustments to each employee's retirement allowance subsequent to the employee's retirement date. The annual adjustments are granted bythe Indiana General Assembly on an ad hoc basis.


      Contributions


      Per Indiana Code Title 5, Articles 10.2 and 10.3, contributions requirements of active employees and the participating employers are established and may be amended by the INPRS Board based on recommendations by the INPRS actuary. Employees are required to contribute three percent of their annual covered salary. The employer is required to contribute at an actuarially determined rate; the current rate for the calendar year 2016 is 11.20% percent of annual covered payroll. The annuity savings account consists of employee contributions, set by state statute at

      three percent of compensation, plus the interest credited to the employee’s account. The employer may elect to make the contributions on behalf of the employee. In 2015, the Commission elected to pay the entire required employee contribution. The actuarial amount, when combined with employee contributions, is expected to finance the costs of benefits earned by employees during the year, with an additional amount to finance any unfunded accrued liability. Contributions to the PERF plan from the Commission were $187,894 for the calendar year ended December 31, 2016.


      Pension Liabilities, Pension Expense and Deferred Outflows of Resources and Deferred Inflows of Resources Related to Pensions


      At December 31, 2016, the Commission reported a liability of $1,274,395 for its proportionate share of the net pension liability. The net pension liability was measured as of June 30, 2016 and the total pension liability used to calculate the net pension liability was determined by an actuarial valuation as of that date. The Commission’s proportion of the net pension liability was based on a projection of the Commission’s long-term share of contributions to the pension plan relative to the projected contributions of all participating units, actuarially determined. At June 30, 2016, the Commission’s proportion was .0002808 percent, which was an increase of .0000121 from its proportion measured as of June 30, 2015. For the year ended December 31, 2016, the Commission recognized pension expense of $190,000. At December 31, 2016, the Commission reported deferred outflows of resources and deferred inflows of resources related to pensions from the following sources:


      Deferred Outflow of Resources

      Deferred Inflow of Resources

      Differences between expected and actual experience


      $ 28,551


      $ 2,352


      Net difference between projected and actual investment earnings on pension plan investments


      280,298


      71,705

      Change of assumptions

      56,227

      -

      Changes in proportion and differences between employer contributions and proportionate share of contributions


      38,513


      15,115

      Commission contributions subsequent to the measurement date


      91,507


      -

      Totals

      $ 495,096

      $ 89,172


      $91,507 reported as deferred outflows of resources related to pensions resulting from Commission contribution subsequent to the measurement date will be recognized as deferred outflows in the year ended December 31, 2016. Other amounts reported as deferred outflows of resources and deferred inflows of resources related to pensions will be recognized in pension expense as follows:

      YearEnded December 31,

      2017

      $ 119,603

      2018

      77,993

      2019

      82,904

      2020

      33,917

      2021

      -

      Thereafter

      -

      Total

      $ 314,417

      Actuarial Assumptions


      The total pension liability in the June 30, 2016 actuarial valuation was determined using the following actuarial assumptions, applied to all periods included in the measurement:


      Inflation 2.25%

      Salary increases 2.50% to 4.25% including inflation

      Investment rate of return 6.75% net of pension plan investment expense,

      including inflation

      Mortality rates RP-2014 Total Data Set Mortality tables projected on a fully generational basis using the future mortality improvement scale inherent in the mortality projection included in the Social Security Administration's 2014 Trustee Report


      The actuarial assumptions used in the June 30, 2016 valuation were based on the results of an actuarial experience study for the four years ended June 30, 2015. The Study was performed in April 2015. As a result of the study inflation decreased from 3.00% to 2.25%, future salary rates decreased from a table range of 3.25% to 4.50% to a table ranging from 2.50% to 4.25%. The mortality rates changed from the 2013 IRS Static Mortality projected five years with Scale AA to the process referenced above. Each of these assumption changes were made to more closely reflect actual experience.


      The long-term expected rate of return on pension plan investments was determined using a building-block method in which best-estimate ranges of expected future real rates of return (expected returns, net of pension plan investment expense, and inflation) are developed for each major asset class. These ranges are combined to produce the long- term expected rate of return by weighting the expected future real rates of return by the target asset allocation percentage and by adding expected inflation. The target allocation and best estimates of arithmetic real rates of return as of June 30, 2016 for each major asset class are summarized in the following table.



      Global Asset Clas s


      Target

      Alloc ation

      Long-Term Expected Real Rate of Return

      Public Equity

      22.0%

      5.7%

      Private Equity

      10.0%

      6.2%

      Fixed income - Ex inflation - linked

      24.0%

      2.7%

      Fixed income - Inflation - Linked

      7.0%

      0.7%

      Commodities

      8.0%

      2.0%

      Real Estate

      7.0%

      2.7%

      Absolute Return

      10.0%

      4.0%

      Risk Parity

      12.0%

      5.0%


      Discount Rate


      The discount rate used to measure the total pension liability was 6.75 percent. The projection of cash flows used to determine the discount rate assumed that employee contributions will be made at the current contribution rate and that contributions from units will be made at contractually required rates, actuarially determined. Based on those assumptions, the pension plan’s fiduciary net position was projected to be available to make all projected future benefit payments of current active and inactive employees. Therefore, the long-term expected rate of return on pension plan investments was applied to all periods of projected benefit payments to determine the total pension liability.


      Sensitivity of the Commission’s Proportionate Share of the Net Pension Liability to Changes in the Discount Rate


      The following presents the Commission’s proportional share of the net pension liability calculated using the discount rate of 6.75 percent, as well as what the Commission’s proportionate share of the net pension liability would be if it were calculated using a discount rate that is 1- percentage-point lower (5.75 percent) or 1-percentage point higher (7.75 percent) than the current rate:


      5.75%

      6.75%

      7.75%

      1% Dec rease

      Current Rate

      1% Inc rease

      $ 1,830,333

      $ 1,274,395

      $ 812,327


      Pension Plan Fiduciary Net Position


      Detailed information about the pension plan’s fiduciary net position is available in the separately issued INPRS Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) and Actuarial Valuations. These reports can be found at:


      http://www.in.gov/inprs/files/2016INPRSCAFRBook.pdf http://www.in.gov/inprs/files/2016PERFActuarialReport.pdf


      The plan’s fiduciary net position has been determined on the same basis used by the plan. The plan uses the economic resources measurement focus and the full accrual basis of accounting. Investments are stated at fair value. Contribution revenue is recorded as contributions are due, pursuant to legal requirements. Benefit payments and refunds of employee contributions are recognized as expense when due and payable in accordance with the benefit terms.


      This Page is Intentionally Blank

      image


      Required Supplementary

      Information

      image


      Budgetary Comparison Schedules


      50

      NORTHWESTERN INDIANA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION REQUIRED SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION

      BUDGETARY COMPARISON SCHEDULE GENERAL FUND

      FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2016



      Budgeted Amounts

      Variance

      Actual With Final

      Budgetary Budget

      Basis Positive

      Original Final Amounts (Negative)


      Revenues:


      Grantor

      $ 3,111,056

      $ 3,395,707

      $ 2,499,471

      $ (896,236)

      Local

      540,271

      540,271

      540,271

      -

      Interest

      2,500

      2,500

      2,193

      (307)

      Other

      179,568

      180,568

      94,863

      (85,705)


      Total Revenues 3,833,395 4,119,046 3,136,798 (982,248)


      Expenditures:


      Personnel - Salaries

      1,502,188

      1,502,188

      1,482,669

      19,519

      Personnel - Fringe Benefits

      662,390

      662,390

      630,384

      32,006

      Occupancy

      248,113

      248,113

      245,313

      2,800

      Equipment Service/Maintenance

      105,500

      105,500

      75,294

      30,206

      Departmental

      227,192

      240,382

      149,121

      91,261

      Contractual

      1,047,012

      1,322,203

      491,347

      830,856

      Capital Outlays - Equipment & Furniture

      41,000

      38,270

      34,270

      4,000

      Total Expenditures

      3,833,395

      4,119,046

      3,108,398

      1,010,648

      Net Change In Fund Balance

      -

      -

      28,400

      28,400

      Fund Balances - Beginning

      1,391,553

      1,391,553

      1,391,553

      -

      Fund Balances - Ending

      $ 1,391,553

      $ 1,391,553

      $ 1,419,953

      $ 28,400



      The accompanying Note to the Required Supplementary Information is an integral part of the required supplementary information.

      NORTHWESTERN INDIANA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION REQUIRED SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION

      BUDGETARY COMPARISON SCHEDULE LAPORTE RLF

      FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2016



      Budgeted Amounts


      Variance

      Actual With Final

      Budgetary Budget

      Basis Positive

      Original Final Amounts (Negative)


      Inflows:


      New Loan Receivable

      $ 320,000

      $ 320,000

      $ 118,000

      $ (202,000)

      Interest Revenue

      -

      -

      9,742

      9,742

      -

      Total Inflows

      320,000

      320,000

      127,742

      (192,258)


      Outflows:


      New Loans

      320,000

      320,000

      118,000

      202,000

      Other Services and Charges

      -

      -

      3,610

      (3,610)


      Total Outflows 320,000 320,000 121,610 198,390


      Net Change In Fund Balance - - 6,132 6,132 Fund Balances - Beginning 495,849 495,849 495,849 -

      Fund Balances - Ending

      $ 495,849 $

      495,849 $

      501,981 $

      6,132

      image image image image



      The accompanying Note to the Required Supplementary Information is an integral part of the required supplementary information.

      NORTHWESTERN INDIANA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION REQUIRED SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION

      BUDGETARY COMPARISON SCHEDULE TRANSIT OPERATING

      FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2016



      Budgeted Amounts


      Variance

      Actual With Final

      Budgetary Budget

      Basis Positive

      Original Final Amounts (Negative)


      Revenues:

      Grantor


      $ 3,645,427


      $ 3,645,427


      $ 3,011,314


      $ (634,113)


      Total Revenues 3,645,427 3,645,427 3,011,314 (634,113)


      Expenditures:

      Other Services and Charges 3,645,427 3,645,427 3,011,314 634,113


      Total Expenditures 3,645,427 3,645,427 3,011,314 634,113


      Net Change In Fund Balance - - - - Fund Balances - Beginning - - - -

      Fund Balances - Ending

      $ - $

      - $ - $ -

      image image image image



      The accompanying Note to the Required Supplementary Information is an integral part of the required supplementary information.

      NORTHWESTERN INDIANA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION NOTES TO REQUIRED SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION DECEMBER 31, 2016


      Note 1. Budgets and Budgetary Accounting


      The Commission follows these procedures in establishing the budgetary data reflected in the budgetary comparison schedules:


      1. The Commission’s annual budget for the governmental funds is adopted on a basis consistent with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.


      2. A proposed budget for the ensuing year is submitted to the Commission by the Executive Director. This usually occurs at the fourth quarterly meeting of the Commission which is typically held in October.


      3. The budget as adopted by the Commission is organized by object class categories. Major object class categories which typically include salaries, fringe benefits, occupancy, equipment service and maintenance, departmental, contractual, and capital outlays represent the legal level of control.


      4. Amendments to the adopted budget may be made only by the Commission at any regular meeting of the Commission or at any special meeting of the Commission called to consider the budget.


      5. The Commission has established a Finance and Personnel Committee composed exclusively of Commission members appointed by the Chair. This Committee exercises financial oversight over Commission operations and establishes more detailed accounts.


      6. Amounts presented in the financial statements are the final budget amounts for the year, as legally amended.


      Note 2. Financial Reporting – Pension Plan


      1. Plan Amendments


        In 2016, there were no changes to PERF that impacted the pension benefits during the actuarial period.


      2. Assumption Changes


        An experience study was performed in April of 2015 resulting in an update to the PERF assumptions.


        1. Inflation decreased from 3.00% to 2.25%.


        2. The future salary increase rate decreased from a table ranging from 3.25% to 4.50% to a table ranging from 2.50% to 4.25%.


        3. Mortality changed from the 2013 IRS Static Mortality projected five years with a Scale AA to the RP-2014 (with MP-2014 improvement removed) Total Data Set mortality table projected on a fully generational basis using the future mortality

          improvement scale inherent in the mortality projection included in the Social Security Administration’s 2014 Trustee Report.


        4. Retirement, disability and termination rates were adjusted to reflect recent experience.


      NORTHWESTERN INDIANA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION

      REQUIRED SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION

      SCHEDULE OF THE COMMISSION'S PROPORTIONATE SHARE OF THE NET PENSION LIABILTIY

      Public Employees' Retirement Fund

      Last 10 Fiscal Years

      2016

      2015

      2014

      Commission's proportion of the net

      0.02808%

      0.02687%

      0.02607%

      pension liability (asset)

      Commission's proportion share of the net

      pension liability (asset)

      $ 1,274,395

      $ 1,094,389

      $ 685,103

      Commission's covered employee payroll

      $ 1,345,765

      $ 1,287,150

      $ 1,272,861

      Commission's proportionate share of the net

      pension liability (asset) as a percentage of its

      covered employee payroll

      94.7%

      85.0%

      53.8%

      Plan fiduciary net position as a percentage

      of total pension liability

      75.3%

      77.3%

      84.3%

      Information is not available prior to 2014. Additional years will be added until 10 years of historical data are shown

      .


      NORTHWESTERN INDIANA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION

      REQUIRED SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION

      SCHEDULE OF THE COMMISSION'S CONTRIBUTIONS

      Public Employees' Retirement Fund

      Last 10 Fiscal Years

      2016

      2015

      Contractually required contributions

      $ 190,000

      $ 185,600

      Contributions in relation to the

      contractually required contribution

      (150,726)

      (144,161)

      Contribution deficiency (excess)

      $ 340,726

      $ 329,761

      Commission's covered employee payroll

      $ 1,345,765

      $ 1,287,150

      Contributions as a percentage of

      covered employee payroll

      11.20%

      11.20%

      Information is not available prior to 2014. Additional years will be added until 10

      of historical data are shown.


      This Page is Intentionally Blank

      image


      Supplementary Information


      This Page is Intentionally Blank

      NORTHWESTERN INDIANA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION

      BUDGETARY COMPARISON SCHEDULE TRANSIT CAPITAL

      FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2016



      Budgeted Amounts


      Variance

      Actual With Final

      Budgetary Budget

      Basis Positive

      Original Final Amounts (Negative)


      Revenues:


      Grantor

      $ 1,935,750

      $ 1,935,750

      $ 1,053,313

      $ (882,437)

      Local

      397,156

      397,156

      203,490

      (193,666)


      Total Revenues 2,332,906 2,332,906 1,256,803 (1,076,103)


      Expenditures:

      Capital outlays - transit equipment 2,332,906 2,332,906 1,256,803 1,076,103


      Total Expenditures 2,332,906 2,332,906 1,256,803 1,076,103


      Net Change In Fund Balance - - - - Fund Balances - Beginning - - - -

      Fund Balances - Ending

      $ - $

      - $ - $ -

      image image image image


      59


      This Page is Intentionally Blank

      image


      Statistical


      This Page is Intentionally Blank


      STATISTICAL SECTION

      Table of Contents


      This part of the Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission comprehensive annual financial report presents detailed information as a context for understanding what the information in the financial statements, note disclosures, and required supplementary information says about the government’s overall financial health.


      Contents Pages

      Financial Trends 65 - 68

      These schedules contain trend information to help the reader understand how the government’s financial performance and well-being have changed over time.

      Demographic and Economic Information 71 - 72

      These schedules offer demographic and economic indicators to help the reader understand the environment within which the government’s financial activities take place.

      Operating Information 74 - 75

      These schedules contain service and capital data to help the reader understand how the information in the government’s financial report as it relates to the activities it performs.

      Sources: Unless otherwise noted, the information in these schedules is derived from the comprehensive financial reports for the relevant year.

      image


      Financial Trends


      Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission Net Position by Component

      65

      Last Ten Fiscal Years (accrual basis of accounting)


      Fiscal Year

      2016

      2015

      2014

      2013

      2012 2011

      2010

      2009

      2008

      2007


      Governmental activities

      Net investment in capital assets

      $ 3,308,757

      $ 3,167,949

      $ 3,230,550

      $ 4,286,809

      $ 3,711,814 $ 4,546,806

      $ 4,712,056

      $ 2,335,894

      $ 2,954,406

      $ 3,732,664

      Restricted

      501,981

      495,847

      517,548

      496,401

      494,508 520,783

      * -

      -

      -

      -

      Unrestricted

      461,106

      547,272

      1,269,166

      1,032,004

      1,085,704 1,191,026

      1,964,365

      1,863,109

      1,840,419

      1,870,738

      Total governmental activities net position

      $ 4,271,844

      $ 4,211,068

      $ 5,017,264

      $ 5,815,214

      image

      $ 5,292,026 $ 6,258,615

      $ 6,676,421

      $ 4,199,003

      $ 4,794,825

      $ 5,603,402


      * Prior to 2011 restricted funds were not reported separately from unrestricted funds.


      Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission Changes in Net Position

      Last Ten Fiscal Years (accrual basis of accounting)


      Fiscal Year

      2016

      2015

      2014

      2013

      2012

      2011

      2010

      2009

      2008

      2007

      Expenses Governmental Activities:

      Planning and Development


      $ 3,188,387


      $ 3,131,609


      $ 2,982,481


      $ 2,978,453


      $ 3,227,570


      $ 3,424,211


      $ 3,318,143


      $ 2,758,597


      $ 3,218,449


      $ 3,445,558

      Transit Operating

      3,011,314

      2,739,753

      3,218,566

      2,904,493

      4,064,024

      5,151,766

      4,318,720

      3,234,228

      3,070,455

      3,433,634

      Transit Capital

      1,150,265

      1,231,002

      1,241,494

      1,172,318

      1,395,717

      1,144,805

      1,116,585

      334,588

      221,375

      291,054

      Total Expenses

      $ 7,349,966

      $ 7,102,364

      $ 7,442,541

      $ 7,055,264

      $ 8,687,311

      $ 9,720,782

      $ 8,753,448

      $ 6,327,413

      $ 6,510,279

      $ 7,170,246


      66

      Program Revenues Governmental Activities:

      Charges for Services:

      Operating Grants and Contributions

      5,602,038

      5,280,329

      5,755,607

      5,331,919

      6,636,745

      7,887,671

      7,271,126

      4,913,156

      4,964,960

      5,627,451

      Capital Grants and Contributions

      1,256,803

      1,154,881

      137,207

      1,699,524

      534,323

      950,587

      3,430,368

      282,980

      186,228

      1,481,473

      Total Program Revenues

      $ 6,858,841

      $ 6,435,210

      $ 5,892,814

      $ 7,031,443

      $ 7,171,068

      $ 8,838,258

      $ 10,701,494

      $ 5,196,136

      $ 5,151,188

      $ 7,108,924


      Net (Expense)/Revenue

      Governmental Activities $ (491,125) $ (667,154) $ (1,549,727) $ (23,821) $ (1,516,243) $ (882,524) $ 1,948,046 $ (1,131,277) $ (1,359,091) $ (61,322)

      image image image image image image image image image image

      Total Net (Expense)/Revenue $ (491,125) $ (667,154) $ (1,549,727) $ (23,821) $ (1,516,243) $ (882,524) $ 1,948,046 $ (1,131,277) $ (1,359,091) $ (61,322)

      image image image image image image image image image image


      General Revenues and Other Changes in Net Position Governmental Activities:

      Unassigned County Contributions

      $ 540,271

      $ 540,271

      $ 540,271

      $ 540,271

      $ 519,028

      $ 519,028

      $ 519,028

      $ 519,028

      $ 519,028

      $ 518,931

      Unassigned Interest Income

      11,935

      5,790

      4,391

      9,383

      9,653

      7,551

      14,410

      28,445

      53,428

      61,001

      Restricted Interest Income

      -

      -

      -

      -

      2,783

      2,793

      2,017

      3,041

      2,259

      3,794

      Total Primary Government

      $ 552,206

      $ 546,061

      $ 544,662

      $ 549,654

      $ 531,464

      $ 529,372

      $ 535,455

      $ 550,514

      $ 574,715

      $ 583,726


      Total Change in Net Position $ 61,081 $ (121,093) $ (1,005,065) $ 525,833 $ (984,779) $ (353,152) $ 2,483,501 $ (580,763) $ (784,376) $ 522,404

      image image image image image image image image image image



      Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission Fund Balances of Governmental Funds

      Last Ten Fiscal Years (modified accrual basis of accounting)


      Fiscal Year

      image

      2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007

      image


      General Fund

      image

      image

      image

      image

      image

      image

      image

      image

      image

      image

      67

      Nonspendable $ - $ 22,858 $ 23,681 $ 2,534 $ 641 $ 26,916 $ - $ - $ - $ - Unassigned 1,419,953 1,369,002 1,350,451 1,303,028 1,316,243 1,373,654 1,558,248 1,460,769 1,402,679 1,352,164

      Total General Fund $ 1,419,953 $ 1,391,860 $ 1,374,132 $ 1,305,562 $ 1,316,884 $ 1,400,570 $ 1,558,248 $ 1,460,769 $ 1,402,679 $ 1,352,164

      image image image image image image image image image image


      All other governmental funds


      Restricted

      $ 501,981

      $ 495,847

      $ 493,867

      $ 493,867

      $ 493,867

      $ 493,867

      * $

      -

      $ -

      $ -

      $ -

      Unassigned

      -

      -

      -

      -

      -

      -

      493,866

      505,504

      505,504

      583,744

      Total all other governmental funds

      $ 501,981

      $ 495,847

      $ 493,867

      $ 493,867

      $ 493,867

      $ 493,867

      $

      493,866

      $ 505,504

      $ 505,504

      $ 583,744


      * Prior to 2011 restricted funds were not reported separately from unrestricted funds.



      Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission Changes in Fund Balances of Governmental Funds Last Ten Fiscal Years

      68

      (modified accrual basis of accounting)


      Fiscal Year

      image

      2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007

      image

      Revenues

      Intergovernmental - County Appropriations


      540,271


      540,271


      540,271


      540,271


      540,271


      519,028


      519,028


      519,028


      519,028


      519,028

      Intergovernmental - Federal Agencies

      4,088,141

      3,753,325

      3,112,013

      3,771,830

      4,023,433

      5,316,733

      6,249,057

      3,042,880

      2,979,074

      3,829,248

      Intergovernmental - State Agencies

      2,296,414

      2,148,522

      2,435,592

      2,656,309

      2,591,311

      2,907,273

      3,155,464

      2,153,224

      2,318,640

      2,285,161

      Intergovernmental - Local Agencies

      301,038

      336,457

      312,097

      550,277

      464,747

      438,951

      1,094,581

      543,738

      585,498

      766,448

      Non-Governmental

      176,858

      198,459

      35,311

      57,457

      99,103

      182,721

      209,560

      108,662

      48,828

      234,176

      Interest Income

      11,935

      5,790

      4,391

      6,738

      9,383

      12,436

      13,728

      16,427

      31,486

      55,687

      Total Revenues

      $ 7,414,657

      $ 6,982,824

      $ 6,439,675

      $ 7,582,882

      $ 7,728,248

      $ 9,377,142

      $ 11,241,418

      $ 6,383,959

      $ 6,482,554

      $ 7,689,748


      Expenditures

      Current - Planning & Development

      Personnel Services - Salaries

      1,482,669

      1,440,710

      1,416,545

      1,441,682

      1,476,490

      1,594,735

      1,645,088

      1,436,268

      1,494,126

      1,358,402

      Personnel Services - Fringe Benefits

      630,384

      615,718

      587,307

      603,923

      638,160

      697,320

      603,106

      520,538

      496,176

      478,471

      Other Services and Charges

      3,975,999

      3,738,287

      4,182,019

      3,801,286

      5,136,559

      6,263,209

      5,403,306

      4,034,475

      4,298,602

      4,273,034

      Capital Outlays

      1,291,073

      1,168,401

      185,235

      1,747,313

      560,725

      979,555

      3,504,077

      334,588

      221,375

      1,495,607

      Total Expenditures

      $ 7,380,125

      $ 6,963,116

      $ 6,371,106

      $ 7,594,204

      $ 7,811,934

      $ 9,534,819

      $ 11,155,577

      $ 6,325,869

      $ 6,510,279

      $ 7,605,514


      Net Change in Fund Balances $ 34,532 $ 19,708 $ 68,569 $ (11,322) $ (83,686) $ (157,677) $ 85,841 $ 58,090 $ (27,725) $ 84,234

      image image image image image image image image image image

      image


      Demographic and Economic Information


      This Page is Intentionally Blank

      Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission Demographic and Economic Statistics

      Last Ten Fiscal Years


      Public


      Fiscal Year

      2016

      Median Per Capita Personal School Unemployment Population (1) Age (2) Income (2) Income Enrollment (3) Rate (4)

      Lake County 485,846 n/a n/a n/a 74,862 6.3

      Porter County 167,791 n/a n/a n/a 26,268 5.1

      LaPorte County 110,015 n/a n/a n/a 17,528 5.9

      Lake County

      487,865

      38.7

      $ 24,756

      $ 12,077,585,940

      82,984

      6.8

      Porter County

      167,688

      39.7

      $ 29,922

      $ 5,017,560,336

      27,453

      5.4

      LaPorte County

      110,884

      39.9

      $ 23,499

      $ 2,605,663,116

      17,989

      6.3

      2015

      Lake County

      490,574

      38.3

      $ 24,945

      $ 12,237,368,430

      83,359

      7.9

      Porter County

      167,308

      40.1

      $ 28,880

      $ 4,831,855,040

      27,746

      6.2

      LaPorte County

      111,695

      40.8

      $ 22,835

      $ 2,550,555,325

      16,941

      7.2

      2014

      Lake County

      491,560

      38.2

      $ 24,400

      $ 11,994,064,000

      85,268

      9.2

      Porter County

      166,578

      39.2

      $ 30,630

      $ 5,102,284,140

      28,090

      7.4

      LaPorte County

      111,376

      39.2

      $ 22,654

      $ 2,523,111,904

      16,894

      9.4

      2013

      Lake County

      493,192

      37.7

      $ 22,911

      $ 11,299,521,912

      78,794

      9.4

      Porter County

      165,765

      38.8

      $ 27,362

      $ 4,535,661,930

      27,160

      7.7

      LaPorte County

      111,223

      39.9

      $ 21,982

      $ 2,444,903,986

      17,492

      9.9

      2012

      Lake County

      494,788

      37.5

      $ 23,436

      $ 11,595,851,568

      79,874

      9.9

      Porter County

      165,510

      38.4

      $ 27,186

      $ 4,499,554,860

      27,090

      7.9

      LaPorte County

      111,223

      39.3

      $ 22,210

      $ 2,470,262,830

      17,884

      10.4

      2011

      71

      Lake County

      496,005

      37.2

      $ 21,722

      $ 10,774,220,610

      82,143

      11.0

      Porter County

      164,343

      38.0

      $ 25,012

      $ 4,110,547,116

      27,336

      8.8

      LaPorte County

      111,467

      39.7

      $ 20,982

      $ 2,338,800,594

      17,662

      11.9

      2010

      Lake County

      494,211

      37.3

      $ 22,389

      $ 11,064,890,079

      82,874

      10.7

      Porter County

      163,598

      38.4

      $ 26,828

      $ 4,389,007,144

      27,645

      9.4

      LaPorte County

      111,063

      38.5

      $ 22,252

      $ 2,471,373,876

      17,730

      11.9

      2009

      Lake County

      493,800

      37.3

      $ 23,551

      $ 11,629,483,800

      83,712

      6.2

      Porter County

      162,181

      37.9

      $ 29,497

      $ 4,783,852,957

      27,561

      4.7

      LaPorte County

      110,888

      38.6

      $ 24,620

      $ 2,730,062,560

      17,879

      6.2

      2008

      2007


      Lake County

      492,104

      37.3

      $ 22,853

      $ 11,246,052,712

      84,711

      5.2

      Porter County

      160,578

      37.9

      $ 28,218

      $ 4,531,190,004

      27,580

      3.9

      LaPorte County

      109,787

      38.9

      $ 21,524

      $ 2,363,055,388

      18,151

      5.1

      Sources: 1. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Estimates Program

        1. U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates

        2. Indiana Department of Education

        3. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Annual Average Unemployment (not seasonally adjusted)


The sources for this information did not make available all information presented. Information unavailable is indicated above by n/a (not available).


Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission Employment by Industry

Current Year and Nine Years Ago


2016

image

2007

image

Percentage of Percentage of

Total Region Total Region

72

Industry Employees Rank Employment Employees Rank Employment


Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting

252

18

0.09%

361

19

0.10%

Mining

114

19

0.04%

314

20

0.10%

Utilities

0

21

0.00%

1,605

18

0.50%

Construction

16,389

5

5.75%

20,197

6

6.80%

Manufacturing

41,367

2

14.51%

44,664

1

15.00%

Wholesale Trade

3,296

14

1.16%

8,673

12

2.90%

Retail Trade

37,789

3

13.25%

38,595

3

13.00%

Transportation & Warehousing

7,986

10

2.80%

9,828

10

3.30%

Information

2,611

16

0.92%

3,395

16

1.10%

Finance and Insurance

6,183

13

2.17%

6,953

14

2.30%

Real Estate and Rental and Leasing

3,187

15

1.12%

3,475

15

1.20%

Professional and Technical Services

7,701

11

2.70%

8,198

13

2.80%

Management of Companies and Enterprises

2,446

17

0.86%

1,980

17

0.70%

Admin. & Support & Waste Mgt. & Rem. Services

13,218

7

4.63%

12,820

8

4.30%

Educational Services

14,122

6

4.95%

23,001

5

7.70%

Health Care and Social Services

45,560

1

15.98%

41,094

2

13.80%

Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation

7,586

12

2.66%

9,400

11

3.20%

Accommodation and Food Services

28,562

4

10.02%

25,520

4

8.60%

Other Services (Except Public Administration)

10,801

9

3.79%

10,912

9

3.70%

Public Administration

12,256

8

4.30%

14,421

7

4.90%

Unclassified

1

20

0.00%

32

21

0.00%


Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics - Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (Annual Average Employment by Industry)

image


Operating Information


73


Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission Full-time Equivalent Employees by Function

Last Ten Fiscal Years


74

Full-time Equivalent Employees as of December 31


2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

Function

Governmental Activities

Planning & Development:

Finance & Administration

8

9

9

9

9

11

11

11

11

12

Planning Department

10

12

12

13

13

15

14

13

14

11

Environmental Department

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

3

3

3

Partner Agency

1

1

1

1

1

1

3

2

2

2

Transit Operating:

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Transit Capital:

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total Employees

23

26

26

27

27

31

32

29

30

28


Source: Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission, Department of Finance and Personnel


Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission Capital Asset Statistics by Function

Last Ten Fiscal Years


75

Fiscal Year


2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

General Government:

Office Equipment

Computer Workstations

35

35

35

79

54

55

70

52

50

50

Network Servers

5

4

6

7

7

5

5

4

4

4

Traffic Counters

8

8

8

26

26

26

36

36

20

20

Transit Capital:

Vehicles

86

90

80

81

77

81

81

68

90

90


Source: Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission, Department of Finance and Personnel


This Page is Intentionally Blank

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Compliance


This Page is Intentionally Blank


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STATE OF INDIANA

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER STATE BOARD OF ACCOUNTS 302 WEST WASHINGTON STREET

ROOM E418 INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 46204-2769


Telephone: (317) 232-2513

Fax: (317) 232-4711

Web Site: www.in.gov/sboa


INDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING AND ON COMPLIANCE AND OTHER MATTERS BASED ON AN AUDIT OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS PERFORMED IN ACCORDANCE WITH GOVERNMENT AUDITING STANDARDS


TO: THE OFFICIALS OF THE NORTHWESTERN INDIANA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION, LAKE, PORTER, AND LAPORTE COUNTIES, INDIANA


We have audited, in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America and the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards issued by the Comptroller General of the United States, the financial statements of the governmental activities and each major fund of the Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission (Commission), as of and for the year ended December 31, 2016, and the related notes to the financial statements, which collectively comprise the Commission's basic financial statements, and have issued our report thereon dated May 30, 2017.


Internal Control over Financial Reporting


In planning and performing our audit of the financial statements, we considered the Commission's internal control over financial reporting (internal control) to determine the audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances for the purpose of expressing our opinion on the financial statements, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Commission's internal control. Accordingly, we do not express an opinion on the effectiveness of the Commission's internal control.


A deficiency in internal control exists when the design or operation of a control does not allow management or employees, in the normal course of performing their assigned functions, to prevent, or detect and correct, misstatements on a timely basis. A material weakness is a deficiency, or combination of deficiencies, in internal control such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the Commission's financial statements will not be prevented, or detected and corrected, on a timely basis. A significant deficiency is a deficiency, or combination of deficiencies, in internal control that is less severe than a material weakness, yet important enough to merit attention by those charged with governance.


Our consideration of internal control was for the limited purpose described in the first paragraph of this section and was not designed to identify all deficiencies in internal control that might be material weak- nesses or significant deficiencies. Given these limitations, during our audit we did not identify any deficien- cies in internal control that we consider to be material weaknesses. However, material weaknesses may exist that have not been identified.


INDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING AND ON COMPLIANCE AND OTHER MATTERS BASED ON AN AUDIT OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS PERFORMED IN ACCORDANCE WITH GOVERNMENT AUDITING STANDARDS

(Continued)


Compliance and Other Matters


As part of obtaining reasonable assurance about whether the Commission's financial statements are free of material misstatement, we performed tests of its compliance with certain provisions of laws, regulations, contracts, and grant agreements, noncompliance with which could have a direct and material effect on the determination of financial statement amounts. However, providing an opinion on compliance with those provisions was not an objective of our audit and, accordingly, we do not express such an opinion. The results of our tests disclosed no instances of noncompliance or other matters that are required to be reported under Government Auditing Standards.


Purpose of This Report


The purpose of this report is solely to describe the scope of our testing of internal control and compliance and the results of that testing, and not to provide an opinion on the effectiveness of the Commission's internal control or on compliance. This report is an integral part of an audit performed in accordance with Government Auditing Standards in considering the Commission's internal control and compliance. Accordingly, this communication is not suitable for any other purpose.


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Paul D. Joyce, CPA State Examiner



May 30, 2017


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STATE OF INDIANA

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER STATE BOARD OF ACCOUNTS 302 WEST WASHINGTON STREET

ROOM E418 INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 46204-2769


Telephone: (317) 232-2513

Fax: (317) 232-4711

Web Site: www.in.gov/sboa


INDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S REPORT ON COMPLIANCE FOR EACH MAJOR FEDERAL PROGRAM; REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER COMPLIANCE; AND REPORT ON SCHEDULE

OF EXPENDITURES OF FEDERAL AWARDS REQUIRED BY THE UNIFORM GUIDANCE


TO: THE OFFICIALS OF THE NORTHWESTERN INDIANA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION, LAKE, PORTER, AND LAPORTE COUNTIES, INDIANA


Report on Compliance for Each Major Federal Program


We have audited the Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission's (Commission) compliance with the types of compliance requirements described in the OMB Compliance Supplement that could have a direct and material effect on each of its major federal programs for the year ended December 31, 2016. The Commission's major federal programs are identified in the Summary of Auditor's Results section of the accompanying Schedule of Findings and Questioned Costs.


Management's Responsibility


Management is responsible for compliance with federal statutes, regulations, and the terms and conditions of its federal awards applicable to its federal programs.


Auditor's Responsibility


Our responsibility is to express an opinion on compliance for each of the Commission's major federal programs based on our audit of the types of compliance requirements referred to above. We conducted our audit of compliance in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America; the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards, issued by the Comptroller General of the United States; and the audit requirements of Title 2

U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards (Uniform Guidance). Those standards and the Uniform Guidance require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether noncompliance with the types of compliance requirements referred to above that could have a direct and material effect on a major federal program occurred. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence about the Commission's compliance with those requirements and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances.


We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion on compliance for each major federal program. However, our audit does not provide a legal determination of the Commission's com- pliance.


Opinion on Each Major Federal Program


In our opinion, the Commission complied, in all material respects, with the types of compliance requirements referred to above that could have a direct and material effect on each of its major federal programs for the year ended December 31, 2016.

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S REPORT ON COMPLIANCE FOR EACH MAJOR FEDERAL PROGRAM; REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER COMPLIANCE; AND REPORT ON SCHEDULE

OF EXPENDITURES OF FEDERAL AWARDS REQUIRED BY THE UNIFORM GUIDANCE

(Continued)


Report on Internal Control over Compliance


Management of the Commission is responsible for establishing and maintaining effective internal control over compliance with the types of compliance requirements referred to above. In planning and performing our audit of compliance, we considered the Commission's internal control over compliance with the types of requirements that could have a direct and material effect on each major federal program to determine the auditing procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances for the purpose of expressing our opinion on compliance for each major federal program and to test and report on internal control over compliance in accordance with the Uniform Guidance, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of internal control over compliance. Accordingly, we do not express an opinion on the effectiveness of the Commission's internal control over compliance.


A deficiency in internal control over compliance exists when the design or operation of a control over compliance does not allow management or employees, in the normal course of performing their assigned functions, to prevent, or detect and correct, noncompliance with a type of compliance requirement of a federal program on a timely basis. A material weakness in internal control over compliance is a deficiency, or combination of deficiencies, in internal control over compliance, such that there is a reason- able possibility that material noncompliance with a type of compliance requirement of a federal program will not be prevented, or detected and corrected, on a timely basis. A significant deficiency in internal control over compliance is a deficiency, or combination of deficiencies, in internal control over compliance with a type of compliance requirement of a federal program that is less severe than a material weakness in internal control over compliance, yet important enough to merit attention by those charged with governance.


Our consideration of internal control over compliance was for the limited purpose described in the first paragraph of this section and was not designed to identify all deficiencies in internal control over com- pliance that might be material weaknesses or significant deficiencies. We did not identify any deficiencies in internal control over compliance that we consider to be material weaknesses. However, material weak- nesses may exist that have not been identified.


The purpose of this report on internal control over compliance is solely to describe the scope of our testing of internal control over compliance and the results of that testing based on the requirements of the Uniform Guidance. Accordingly, this report is not suitable for any other purpose.


Report on Schedule of Expenditures of Federal Awards Required by the Uniform Guidance


We have audited the financial statements of governmental activities and each major fund of the Commission, as of and for the year ended December 31, 2016, and the related notes to the financial state- ments, which collectively comprise Commission's basic financial statements. We issued our report thereon dated May 30, 2017, which contained unmodified opinions on those financial statements. Our audit was conducted for the purpose of forming opinions on the financial statements that collectively comprise the basic financial statements. The accompanying Schedule of Expenditures of Federal Awards is presented for purposes of additional analysis as required by the Uniform Guidance and is not a required part of the basic financial statements. Such information is the responsibility of management and was derived from and relates directly to the underlying accounting and other records used to prepare the financial statements. The information has been subjected to the auditing procedures applied in the audit of the financial state- ments and certain additional procedures, including comparing and reconciling such information directly to the underlying accounting and other records used to prepare the basic financial statements or to the basic financial statements themselves, and other additional procedures in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. In our opinion, the Schedule of Expenditures of Federal Awards is fairly stated in all material respects in relation to the basic financial statements as a whole.


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Paul D. Joyce, CPA State Examiner


May 30, 2017

NORTHWESTERN INDIANA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION SCHEDULE OF EXPENDITURES OF FEDERAL AWARDS

FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2016

Pass-Through


Federal

Entity (or Other)

Total

Federal Grantor Agency/Pass-Through Entity

CFDA

Identifying

Pass-Through

Commission

Federal Awards

Cluster Title/Program Title/Project Title

Number

Number

To Subrecipient

Expended

Expended

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

Direct Grant

Economic Development Cluster

Economic Adjustment Assistance 11.307 06-39-02180 $ LaPorte Revolving Loan Fund


Pass-Through Northwest Indiana Regional Development Authority


- $ 363,503 $


363,503


Coastal Zone Management Administration Awards

11.419

CZ520

-

26,483

26,483

Total for Federal Grantor Agency

-

389,986

389,986

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Direct Grant

Federal Transit Cluster


Federal Transit_Formula Grants

20.507

IN-90-X667

1,120,022

1,214,980

2,335,002

IN-95-X053

-

187,581

187,581

IN-90-X669

218,204

-

218,204

IN-90-X609

48,397

-

48,397

IN-2016-X033

180,699

31,620

212,319

IN-95-X035

602,338

-

602,338

IN90-X653

113,629

148,628

262,257

Total for Cluster

2,283,289

1,582,809

3,866,098

Enhanced Mobility of Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities

20.513

IN-16-X012

59,185

-

59,185

New Freedom Program

20.521

IN-57-X010

145,447

-

145,447

Total for Direct Grant

2,487,921

1,582,809

4,070,730

Pass-Through Indiana Department of Transportation Highway Planning and Construction Cluster


Highway Planning and Construction

20.205

0017804837

-

280,637

280,637

PL-0016803140

-

684,833

684,833

Surface Transportation Program

STP-0016804160

-

77,461

77,461

Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ)

CQ-0016804160

-

45,494

45,494

0017804837

-

238,298

238,298

Highway Safety Improvement Program

0017804837

-

39,545

39,545

HSIP-0016816485

-

11,054

11,054

Total for Cluster

-

1,377,322

1,377,322

Pass-Through Indiana Department of Transportation


Metropolitan Transportation Planning and State and Non-Metropolitan

Planning and Research

20.505

5303-0016803140

-

389,511

389,511

Total for Federal Grantor Agency 2,487,921 3,349,642 5,837,563


U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

Direct Grant

Urban Waters Small Grants 66.440 00E01318 - 17,411 17,411


Pass-Through Indiana Department of Environmental Management


Nonpoint Source Implementation Grants


Pass-Through Northwest Indiana Regional Development Authority

66.460

0014530174

-

6,188

6,188

Brownfields Assessment and Cleanup Cooperative Agreements

66.818

1151

-

17,080

17,080

Total for Federal Grantor Agency

-

40,679

40,679

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

Pass-Through Mid-America Regional Council

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Information

Dissemination, Outreach, Training and Technical Analysis/Assistance

81.117

DE-EE0006310

-

1,669

1,669

Rooftop Solar Challenge II Grant


Total for Federal Grantor Agency - 1,669 1,669


Total Federal Awards Expended

$ 2,487,921

$ 3,781,976

$ 6,269,897

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The accompanying notes are an integral part of the Schedule of Expenditures of Federal Awards.


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NORTHWESTERN INDIANA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION NOTES TO SCHEDULE OF EXPENDITURES OF FEDERAL AWARDS DECEMBER 31, 2016


Note 1. Basis of Presentation


The accompanying Schedule of Expenditures of Federal Awards (SEFA) includes the federal grant activity of the Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission (Commission) and is presented in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America which is the basis of accounting used in presentation of the financial statements. Accordingly, the amount of federal awards expended is based on when the activity related to the award occurs. Therefore, some amounts presented in this schedule may differ from amounts presented in, or used in preparation of, the basic financial statements.


Note 2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies


Expenditures reported on the SEFA are reported on the accrual basis of accounting. Such expenditures are recognized following, as applicable, either the cost principles in OMB Circular A133, Cost Principles for State, Local, and Indian Tribal Governments, or the cost principles contained in Title 2 U.S. Code of Federal Regulations Part 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, wherein certain types of expenditures are not allowed or are limited as to reimbursement. When federal grants are received on a reimbursement basis, the federal awards are considered expended when the liability is incurred. The Commission has elected not to use the 10% de minimis cost rate allowed under the Uniform Guidance.


Note 3. Calculation of Expenditures of the Economic Development Administration Revolving Loan Fund


Balance of RLF loans outstanding at the end of the fiscal year

$ 313,458

Plus: Cash and investment balance in the RLF at the end of the fiscal year

188,522

Total Calculation Basis


501,980

Calculation for Federal Participation Rate

Original Economic Development Administration Funding

700,000

Local Match:

266,667

Total Original Grant with Original Match

966,667

Federal Participation Rate (Federal grant awarded divided by total program)


72.41%

The Federal share of the LaPorte Revolving Loan Fund

$ 363,503


NORTHWESTERN INDIANA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMSSSION SCHEDULE OF FINDINGS AND QUESTIONED COSTS


Section I – Summary of Auditor's Results


Financial Statements:

Type of auditor's report issued: Unmodified Internal control over financial reporting:

Material weaknesses identified? no

Significant deficiencies identified? none reported Noncompliance material to financial statements noted? no

Federal Awards:


Internal control over major programs:

Material weaknesses identified? no

Significant deficiencies identified? none reported


Any audit findings disclosed that are required to be reported

in accordance with 2 CFR 200.516(a)? no


Identification of Major Programs and type of auditor’s report issued on compliance for each:



Name of Federal Program or Cluster

Opinion

Issued

Economic Development Cluster

Unmodified

Federal Transit Cluster

Unmodified


Dollar threshold used to distinguish between Type A and Type B programs: $750,000 Auditee qualified as low-risk auditee? no


Section II – Financial Statement Findings


No matters are reportable.


Section III – Federal Award Findings and Questioned Costs


No matters are reportable.


This Page is Intentionally Blank


OTHER REPORTS


In addition to this report, other reports may have been issued for the Commission. All reports can be found on the Indiana State Board of Accounts’ website: http://www.in.gov/sboa/.

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